The urgency of AI is coming that fact that artificial intelligence (AI) is changing the world. It impacts societies, organizations, work, and education, and it is becoming more and more a part of everyday life. But at the same time, we are witnesses to growing inequalities within societies and between countries. We have a “learning crisis” in global education: according to recent reports from UNESCO and the World Bank, millions of young students face the prospect of losing out on opportunities because their schools are failing to educate them to succeed in life. We also know that unemployment is a reality for many youngsters and adults because the nature of work is changing and new competences are needed.

The UNESCO conference call for AI research and applications demands:

Already today, there is a major skills gap in the labour market when it comes to AI-related jobs and skills. Educational institutions and training providers will need to address these skills gaps to ensure that future graduates will meet the requirements of the job market and enable an AI-literate citizenry.”

Mobile Learning Week 2019 – Call for proposals

We need serious efforts to prevent the development in which AI will exacerbate digital divides and deepen existing income and learning inequalities, as marginalized and disadvantaged groups are more likely to be excluded from AI-powered education. The penetration of AI in education comes also  with concerns about ethics, security and human rights.  It sets several new challenges to research, policy-making and governance as well as companies with their business.
 

Workshop organized  by the University of Helsinki 

Using 21st Century Intelligent Technology Tools in Education

Chinese — American — Finnish Workshop Feb. 1315, 2019

University of Helsinki

Teacher Education Policy in Europe (TEPE) conference at the University of Helsinki, May 13–15, 2020

The theme of the 14th TEPE conference is sustainability and ethics in teacher education and education policy. This theme connects with important global developments, trends and discourses, and therefore reflects societal needs. Urgent themes are how teacher education can provide solutions to global learning crises through teachers’ high-quality professional work and by creating sustainable learning opportunities for all learners. (See more: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/education-news/the-first-virtual-full-scale-international-conference-at-the-university-of-helsinki-on-teacher-education-policy-in-europe-succeeded)

During the three days, the conference hosted four eminent keynote speakers and their presentations are still available, any time – it’s all just a click away on the website of TEPE 2020!

The whole conference book is available and can be read from here: 

 

JoLII 2019 Conference – Equity and Quality of Learning in a Global Digital World

Welcome to the Sino-Finnish Joint Learning Innovation Institute (JoLII) Conference – Equity and Quality of Learning in a Global Digital World, in Rovaniemi, Finland on 2123 August, 2019!

https://www.ulapland.fi/EN/Events/JoLII-2019

 

Finland Team Visit to Odisha June, 5 -7.2019

Professor Hannele Niemi, senior lecturer Sari Muhonen and MR. Matti Pettay  visited India June 4-9, 2019 for starting negotiations how Finnish education experts could promote high quality education through Tata Steel’s education programs.

Read the report of the visit:

This village was very proud of being child labor zero zone. All children were at school.

See more about Tata Steel’s societal contributions:

http://horizons.tatatrusts.org/2019/may/tata-trusts-education-interventions.html

https://www.tatasteel.com/sustainability/our-approach/vision-and-values-for-sustainable-growth/#

Pictures on the left:

Finland teams interacting with teachers of Learning Enhancement Programme LEP

Learnig English using video cartoons

Mathematics lesson

 

 

 

Board meeting and graduation ceremony of the University of the People (UoP) April, 24.2019 in New York

Professor Hannele Niemi was invited as an Advisory Board member of the University of the People (UoP) in 2018.

UoP is tuition-free, which means there is no charge for teaching or instruction. UoPeople charges only an application fee and an Assessment Fee per course completed. For those who cannot afford these fees, scholarships are available to help support their studies.

On April 24th, 11 AM ET, UoPeople hosted its first ever graduation ceremony, setting the standard for a graduation of the 21st Century.

Watch it here, live, from New York City!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW7j_AHGQS0

Read more https://www.uopeople.edu/

https://www.uopeople.edu/programs/ed/leadership/education-in-advanced-teaching-advisory-board/

Picture on the left: President of Shai Reshef of UoP and Professor Hannele Niemi

19.4.2019.

The appeal to the new Government through the main newspaper in Finland, Helsingin Sanomat.

Education as the main objective of the development cooperation and policy

Finland is known as the world leader in education and expertise. The pupils’ excellent learning results and the high level of teachers are praised throughout the world. A study commissioned by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Stepping Up Finland's Global Role in Education (2018) shows convincingly that Finland would have a great deal to offer, in order to have good education available to all children in developing countries.

Finland is known as the world leader in education and expertise. The pupils’ excellent learning results and the high level of teachers are praised throughout the world. A study commissioned by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Stepping Up Finland's Global Role in Education (2018) shows convincingly that Finland would have a great deal to offer, in order to have good education available to all children in developing countries.

However, Finland is very invisible in development cooperation, in particular in the field of basic and higher education and remains behind all Nordic countries. Resources for development cooperation have been radically cut down and education and training-oriented activities are occasional and short-termed.

UN member states, Finland among them, are committed to Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. It highlights 17 major strategic goals to save the world. Education and training are related to almost all of them. The world's major problems such as poverty, health problems, lack of clean water and sanitation, hygienic toilets and functional drainage, environmental issues, climate change, inequality and dramatically increased number of refugees cannot be solved without a strong educational base in every country.

Numerous statistics from UNESCO, as well as World Bank reports, speak of a global learning crisis. Access to primary school for children has improved considerably, but the quality of education in many developing countries is so weak that even after four or six school years, the child is not able to read or calculate a simple task. Although access to elementary school is possible, upper secondary school is still impossible for hundreds of millions of children and especially for girls. Often, the level of teacher’s competence is deficient and teaching is  unconnected with the needs of children and society. As a result, dropping out of school happens often at a young age.

According to UNESCO's calculations, in 2030 there will be over 800 million children and youth in the world who lack the fundamental basic knowledge and skills they need. This will create vast inequalities and high risks in the future. We also know that the biggest problems in education are in refugee camps and so-called “fragile countries” where political confusion and war prevent sustainable development.

Finnish Higher Education institutions have competence in educational issues and teacher training. There are 8 UNESCO professors with different science backgrounds in Finland. All of them recognize that sustainable development and just societies are created through education and higher education co-operation. We appeal to Finnish decision-makers to raise resources for development cooperation and to align Finland to a leading position in education related development cooperation and policy.

On behalf of all UNESCO professors in Finland

Hannele Niemi, Professor of UNESCO, University of Helsinki  

Kaarle Hämeri, Chancellor of the University of Helsinki, Chairman of the Advisory Board of UNESCO Professors in Finland

The appeal in Finnish:

https://www.hs.fi/paivanlehti/19042019/art-2000006077303.html

 

11.12.2017.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO has granted UNESCO Chairs to Professor Emerita Hannele Niemi and Professor Arto Kallioniemi from the University of Helsinki.

UN­ESCO Chairs at the Uni­versity of Helsinki