Dear EXALT-community,

Welcome to the May 2021 edition of the EXALT Initiative newsletter. We had a few busy months in April and May. Some of the highlights were a book discussion on Iron Will by Markus Kröger and a book launch for Our Extractive Age. If you missed either of these events, the recordings are available on the EXALT YouTube channel. Thanks as always for your participation in the EXALT Initiative.

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives 
The EXALT conference will be taking place digitally in 2021 due to the continuing corona virus pandemic. Our conference site is open and more information will be added as we move closer to the conference. Included on the website is our preliminary daily program as well as our plenary speakers. 

We are excited to announce that our plenary speakers include four distinguished scholars: 

  • Dr. Robin Broad, Professor of International Development at the American University’s School of International Service.
  • De­borah Mc­Gregor, an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice at Osgoode Hall Law School at York University.
  • Lochner Marais, Professor of Development Studies at the University of the Free State (UFS).
  • and Andréa Zhouri, Professor of Anthropology at the Federal University of Minas Gerais.

Important Dates to Keep in Mind:

  • August 1st - Registration Opens
  • October 20th - Registration Closes
  • October 25th - 27th - Conference Time!!

PAST EVENTS: Our Extractive Age and Iron Will book event

In the past month we organised two exciting book events: a book discussion for Markus Kröger's Iron Will: Global Extractivism and Mining Resistance in Brazil and India and a book launch for Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance edited by Judith Shapiro and John-Andrew McNeish. Both of these volumes are Open Access. 

You can find the recordings of both of these events as well as recordings from most of our past events on our website

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS: 

Publication: "¿La minería para el buen vivir? Large-scale Mining, Citizenship, and Development in Correa’s Ecuador"
In their article Karolien van Teijlingen and Consuelo Fernández-Salvador examine how Ecuador Estratégico, a government agency tasked with implementing buen vivir (good living) in regions of resource extraction, plays a pivotal role in justifying and legitimizing resource extraction locally. According to van Teijlingen and Fernández-Salvador, these political strategies were key for the onset of large-scale mining under former president Correa, the effects of which may endure for decades.

EXALT READING “Alternative Worldviews - Sharing life: The ecopolitics of reciprocity”

Alternative Worldviews - Sharing life: The ecopolitics of reciprocity by Andreas Weber et al. is an assemblage of 12 stories, poetry, song, artwork and academic writings which speak about alternative worldviews and traditional knowledge systems of the people of Northeast India and beyond. It challenges the ‘extractivist’ perceptions of the Northeast of India as space locked within rigid governance or development frameworks which miss the importance of the region’s ecology and biodiversity.
Evolving around the main essay “Sharing life. The Ecopolitics of Reciprocity” and based on a common understanding of the importance of indigenous knowledge systems and practices, the contributors to this assemblage visualize a wealth of indigenous epistemologies and encourage us to un-learn, de-theorize and re-assemble ourselves and our present thinking and methodologies.

Latest episodes:

  • April 2021 - Saskia Sassen - Why are there so many everyday miseries in big cities?
  • March 2021 - Beril Ocaklı - How has extractivism played out in Soviet and post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan?
  • February 2021 - Yafa El Masri – How can refugees save the world? 
  • January 2021 – Alexander Dunlap - Is "green energy" really that green (and is it better called "fossil fuel plus")? and bonus episode - What is the "World Eater"?

The May podcast is a delightful dive into looks at extractivisms through an artist lens. We were joined by mirko nikolić. mirko is a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Culture and Society (IKOS) at Linköping University (LIU). mirko’s work occupies a post-disciplinary space that falls between art and environmental humanities. mirko’s work explores the many entanglements of climate and social justice in areas affected by extractivism and the intense exploitation of ‘natural resources’. Our conversation went many different places, including how mirko got into this work and extractivisms occurring at the peripheries of southeastern Europe and in the Nordics. This is a look at how extractivisms are experienced outside of the Latin American context. mirko also joined EXALT in 2020 at our digital symposium, you can check out mirko’s performance on the EXALT YouTube.

Dear EXALT-community,

Welcome to the April 2021 edition of the EXALT Initiative newsletter. Here in Helsinki the snow is melted, and we are oscillating between sunny days and freezing rain – typical spring for this area! There are some exciting events coming up, including book launches and an upcoming conference session. Additionally, check out the EXALT YouTube channel if you want to revisit any of our previous events. Thanks as always for your participation in the EXALT Initiative.

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives 

The EXALT conference will be taking place digitally in 2021 due to the continuing corona virus pandemic. While we will miss networking in person, we are working hard to create a vibrant digital space to interact. We have over 60 papers confirmed for the conference and we are working on an exciting keynote line-up.

One of our tracks, Track 4: Expanding Extractivisms – Big Data, Financialization, and Intellectual Extractivisms, has been opened for abstracts submission. Please note that this Call for Papers is open only for Track 4 submissions therefore we will not accept abstracts for any other track. Please see our website for more information.

Important Dates to Keep in Mind:

  • August 1st - Registration Opens
  • October 20th - Registration Closes
  • October 25th - 27th - Conference Time!!

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: Book discussion of Markus Kröger's Iron Will: Global Extractivism and Mining Resistance in Brazil and India

We are happy to welcome you to EXALT's book discussion about Markus Kröger’s recent book Iron Will: Global Extractivism and Mining Resistance in Brazil and India, which explores the role of extractivist policies, their global significance and the local efforts to resist them, in the context of iron ore mining in Brazil and India. To discuss his book Kröger is joined by Professor Alf Nilsen and Sakshi Aravind.

Time: Thursday, April 29, 2021, at 2pm-3.15pm EEST (UTC +3) / 11 am GMT

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: Book Launch - Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance

We are excited to host a book launch for Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance edited by Judith Shapiro and John-Andrew McNeish. Join us for this exciting event to hear about and discuss the content of this groundbreaking volume. The event includes an introduction by the editors, short interventions by the chapter authors, and an interactive Q&A session with the audience.

Time: Thursday, May 20, 2021, at 4pm - 5.30pm GMT 

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: Extractivisms and Alternatives at Sustainability Science Days 2021

EXALT is hosting a session called “Extractivisms and Alternatives” at the Sustainability Science Days organized by Aalto Sustainability and Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS). This session is a robust exploration of renewables, recycling, and new tech developments that could help to address the current forms of destructive and unsustainable extraction of raw materials. See the full program and register for the event. 

Session conveners: Associate professor Markus Kröger, Doctoral Student Sophia Hagolani-Albov, Postdoctoral Researcher Ossi Ollinaho (University of Helsinki), Assistant Professor Annukka Santasalo-Aarnio (Aalto University).

EXALT READING “A Material Transition”

The latest EXALT reading is War on Want's report A Material Transition: Exploring supply and demand solutions for renewable energy minerals. The research examines the potential widespread environmental destruction and human rights abuses unleashed by the extraction of transition minerals – the raw materials needed for the production of renewable energy technologies. A Material Transition highlights what can be done to avert this devastation and sets out a pathway for a globally just energy future.

EXALT PODCAST

 Latest episodes:

This month on the podcast we were honored to spend some time with renowned Professor and author Saskia Sassen. Dr. Sassen is the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Her research and writing focus on globalization, global cities, states in the world economy and international human migration. The three key variables of inequality, gendering and digitization run through her work. Our conversation was wide ranging and very interesting as we explored the connections between health, commuting, and urban inequality; how the financial sector has used increasingly complex methods to squeeze profits out of the poorest people; and why owning a car has become less important in popular consciousness (among many other things!!)

Dear EXALT-community,

Welcome to the March 2021 edition of the EXALT Initiative newsletter. There are lots of exciting events coming up this spring for EXALT. Please feel welcome to send EXALT information your events, publications, and other activities that explore extractivisms and alternatives. We will happily share them on our social media and through our newsletter. We can always be reached via e-mail at exalt (at) helsinki.fi.

If you have missed anything from our program in 2020 or like to revisit a talk, please remember that the recordings are available on our webpage. Below please find the latest from the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Please feel welcome to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives, October 25-27, 2021 Online

The EXALT 2021 Conference will be held online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We are going to be actively updating our conference webpage over the next couple of months as our exciting program comes together. We will share updates about the conference through this newsletter and our social media. We look forward to seeing you on the web in October 2021. If you have any questions or need additional information in the meantime, please do not hesitate to reach out via e-mail at exalt (at) helsinki.fi

EXALT READING “Environmental Racism, Green Colonialism, and The Renewable Energies Revolution”

To commemorate the International week against racism, the latest EXALT reading is an essay called “Environmental Racism, Green Colonialism, and The Renewable Energies Revolution” by Cara Judea Alhadeff. The author writes about the ways in which the so-called green solutions and environmental racism reinforce the very systems of ecological devastation and global wealth inequities that many actors embracing sustainability try to question and even dismantle.  She reminds us that, “however well-intentioned, these supposed alternatives perpetuate the violence of wasteful behavior and destructive infrastructures. Even if temporarily abated, they ultimately conserve the original crisis.”

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: HELSUS Brown Bag lunch hosted by EXALT

March 26, 2021 Online

Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science is hosting EXALT's "Our Extractive Age: Exploring Extractivisms" talk as part of HELSUS Brown Bag Lunch series on Friday March 26, 11AM-12PM. On the academic front, the use of the concept of extractivism has expanded from mining to new arenas like agriculture, forestry, finance, and even the digital. This presentation will provide a brief introduction to the complex web of extractivisms, where data and the digital intersect with natural resource extractivisms and provoke resistances to these processes and underlying ideological and historically-situated logics. This presentation is drawn from our co-authored work in chapters 1 and 9 from the forthcoming Routledge book Our Extractive Age: Expressions of Violence and Resistance, which will be published in May 2021. Presenters: Christopher ChagnonFrancesco Durante, Sophia E. Hagolani-Albov, Saana Hokkanen, Markus Kröger and Will LaFleurLink to the event page.

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT: Ask & answer session on Markus Kröger’s book Iron Will

APRIL 29, 2021 Online

Iron Will: Global Extractivism and Mining Resistance in Brazil and India lays bare the role of extractivist policies and efforts to resist these policies through a deep ethnographic exploration of globally important iron ore mining in Brazil and India. It also addresses resistance strategies to extractivism and tracks their success, or lack thereof, through a comparison of peaceful and armed resource conflicts, explaining how different means of resistance arise. Using the distinctly different contexts and political systems of Brazil and India highlights the importance of local context for resistance. Event link is added on our exalt.fi website in early April.

Markus Kröger is an Associate Professor of Global Development Studies at the University of Helsinki and a research fellow at the Academy of Finland. To discuss his book Kröger is joined by Professor Alf Nilsen and Sakshi Aravind. Nilsen is professor of sociology at the University of Pretoria and a scholar of social movements, political economy, and global development. Aravind is a PhD student at the University of Cambridge, working on Indigenous Environmental Justice in Australia, Brazil, and Canada.

FOLLOW-UP ANNOUNCEMENT: Book launch recording on The Water Defenders

The University of Pittsburgh’s book launch event (March 5) for The Water Defenders: How Ordinary People Saved a Country from Corporate Greed can be viewed here as a recording. 

Session description: In a time when countless communities are resisting powerful corporations—from Flint, Michigan, to the Standing Rock Reservation, to Didipio in the Philippines, to the Gualcarque River in Honduras—Robin Broad and John Cavanagh present the inspirational story of a community that took on an international mining corporation at seemingly insurmountable odds and won not one but two historic victories.

EXALT PODCAST

Latest episodes:

  • February 2021 - Yafa El Masri – How can refugees save the world? 
  • January 2021 – Alexander Dunlap - Is "green energy" really that green (and is it better called "fossil fuel plus")? and bonus episode - What is the "World Eater"?
  • December 2020 – Joshua Mata – How can labor movements help improve the environment?
  • November 2020 - Katherine Trebeck - Should the economy work for society and the environment?

Next episode – Beril Ocaklı

In this month’s episode we get to explore extractivisms from a perspective different from any we have discussed before. Beril Ocaklı joined us to discuss extractivisms through the lens of post-soviet spaces. Beril is a doctoral researcher at IRI THESys at Humboldt University of Berlin and also works full-time for the Federation of German Industry, Committee on Eastern European Economic Relations, where she is implementing the GIZ project “Mineral Resources for Development in Central Asia.” Her research work explores conflict and cooperation in coupled social-ecological systems in Kyrgyzstan. This is an interesting dive into the iterations of extractivisms that are far removed from the Latin American context.  

Dear EXALT-community,

We hope this month’s edition of the newsletter finds everyone in good health and spirits. We are still under snow here in Finland, but there are hints of spring starting to make themselves known. We will make all upcoming event announcements with this newsletter, on our webpage, and via social media. If you have missed anything from our program in 2020 or like to revisit a talk, please remember that the recordings are available on our webpage. Below please find the latest from the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Please feel welcome to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives 

October 25–27, 2021, Helsinki, Finland

A save the date announcement that is the EXALT logo combined with the dates and name of the conference, which are October 25–27, 2021 in Helsinki, Finland, and titled, Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives. The background is thick green trees next to an area of clearcutting. 

The 2021 EXALT Conference will take place digitally in 2021 due to the continuing pandemic. We really look forward to someday having an in-person conference event but want to wait until it is safe and accessible. Over the next month or so the conference webpage will be updated with the preliminary conference program. If you submitted an abstract to the 2020 event, you will soon be getting a separate e-mail with additional information about the 2021 event and how to confirm your continued participation and update your abstract if needed. We deeply appreciate the continued flexibility and patience around the planning of the 2021 event. More information is coming! If you have any questions or need additional information in the meantime, please do not hesitate to reach out via our exalt (at) helsinki.fi  e-mail address.

 EXALT READING “Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary

The latest EXALT Reading is “Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary” by Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Arturo Escobar, Federico Demaria and Alberto Acosta.

“Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary” is an exciting collection of over 100 essays by 120+ contributors on transformative alternatives to the currently dominant processes of globalized development, including its structural roots in modernity, capitalism, state domination, and masculinist values. In the post-development imagination, ‘development’ would no longer be the organizing principle of social life. The book presents worldviews and practices from around the world in a collective search for an ecologically wise and socially just world. Contributors to this volume from activists and academics to practitioners call for a pluriverse, a broad transcultural compilation of concrete concepts, worldviews and practices worldwide, challenging the modernist ontology of universalism in favor of a multiplicity of possible worlds.

Pluriverse is also the topic of one of our EXALT Podcast episodes, featuring Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes who joined us as guest on the December 2019 edition of the EXALT podcast.

PUBLICATION ANOUNCEMENT AND BOOK LAUNCH: The Water Defenders: How Ordinary People Saved a Country from Corporate Greed

By Robin Broad and John Cavanagh

Abstract:  In a time when countless communities are resisting powerful corporations—from Flint, Michigan, to the Standing Rock Reservation, to Didipio in the Philippines, to the Gualcarque River in Honduras—The Water Defenders presents the inspirational story of a community that took on an international mining corporation at seemingly insurmountable odds and won not one but two historic victories. In the early 2000s, many people in El Salvador were at first excited by the prospect of jobs, progress, and prosperity that the Pacific Rim mining company promised. However, farmer Vidalina Morales, brothers Marcelo and Miguel Rivera, and others soon discovered that the river system supplying water to the majority of Salvadorans was in danger of catastrophic contamination. With a group of unlikely allies, local and global, they committed to stop the corporation and the destruction of their home. Based on over a decade of research and their own role as international allies of the community groups in El Salvador, Robin Broad and John Cavanagh unspool this untold story – a tale replete with corporate greed, a transnational lawsuit at a secretive World Bank tribunal in Washington, violent threats, murders, and –surprisingly– victory. The Water Defenders demands that we examine our assumptions about progress and prosperity, while providing valuable lessons for those fighting against destructive corporations in the United States and across the world.

The University of Pittsburgh is organizing a book launch event for The Water Defenders on Friday March 5, 19-20:30PM Eastern European Time (Helsinki) and 12-1:30PM Eastern time (Pittsburgh). Register to attend the book launch!

WORKSHOP SERIES ANNOUCEMENT: Dislocating Urban Studies 

Dislocating Urban Studies: Rethinking Theory, Shifting Practice is a series of digital workshops that invites scholars working on/in/out of the above-mentioned margins who have carried out empirical, methodological or theoretical work that helps expand the boundaries of urban studies. Their aim is to engage in critical dialogue and explore different starting points or strategies that contribute to dislocating the center of the field. In the next workshops, they seek to:

  • Workshop 2: Learn from empirical cases from “off the map” of urban studies / 18-19 March 2021
  • Workshop 3: Explore methodological approaches that allow for research in understudied geographies and contribute to a global comparative urbanism /15-16 April 2021
  • Workshop 4: Challenge, revisit or rethink the usefulness of key concepts in the field (e.g. financialisation, gentrification, displacement, neoliberal urbanism, right to the city) / 17-18 May 2021

WEBINAR SERIES ANNOUNCEMENT: Global South Encounters

The HELSUS Global South Encounters is a series of seminars and small talks intended to sharpen critical research in sustainability science. Recognizing the complexities and peculiarities of the Global South, these seminars engage mainstream sustainability science in order to transcend it, among others by decolonizing nature, economy, society and methodologies. The seminars aim to open up space to get prior feedback on a forthcoming talk, an ongoing dissertation, a draft article, and a variety of research from students at all levels, academics, and members of the general public. Encounters also welcome discussions on giving conference papers and celebrate/publicize published papers. (text from HELSUS webpage).

UPCOMING CONFERENCE SESSIONS:

EXALT PODCAST

Latest episodes:

Next episode – Yafa El Masri

This episode we get the pleasure to speak with Yafa El Masri, who is a PhD Student in Geography at the University of Padova, and was a visiting researcher at the University of Helsinki. She gives us insight to the experience of statelessness from the perspective of Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon. She shares with us the alternatives and livelihoods that operate within the camp. She is currently writing her dissertation on livelihood in Palestinian refugee camps through the lens of situated knowledge. We featured her published article, “72 Years of Homemaking in Waiting Zones: Lebanon's “Permanently Temporary” Palestinian Refugee Camps,” in the December 2020 edition of the EXALT news.

Dear EXALT-community,

Welcome to 2021! While this looks like it will be another “digital year,” we are working hard here at EXALT to put together a productive and interesting year so we can continue to have important conversations around extractivisms and alternatives. Hope to see you all at one or more of our digital events. We will make all upcoming event announcements with this newsletter, on our webpage, and via social media. If you have missed anything from our program in 2020 or like to revisit a talk, please remember that the recordings are available on our webpage. Below please find the latest from the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Please feel welcome to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives 

October 25–27, 2021, Helsinki, Finland

A save the date announcement that is the EXALT logo combined with the dates and name of the conference, which are October 25–27, 2021 in Helsinki, Finland, and titled, Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives. The background is thick green trees next to an area of clearcutting. 

On account of the continuing global pandemic, our 2021 Conference is currently planned to take place digitally. We are working hard behind the scenes to get an engaging and interesting online program together. If you submitted an abstract to the 2020 Conference, we will be sending additional information via e-mail in the coming months. Even though we can only get together digitally, we look forward to creating an accessible and engaging space to foster interesting and important interaction and dialogue around extractivisms and alternatives. Once again, please hold this space in your calendar! More information will be forthcoming!

EXALT READING “The Politics of Ecocide, Genocide and Megaprojects: Interrogating Natural Resource Extraction, Identity and the Normalization of Erasure”

The latest EXALT Reading is “The Politics of Ecocide, Genocide and Megaprojects: Interrogating Natural Resource Extraction, Identity and the Normalization of Erasure” by Alexander Dunlap. Alexander is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Oslo, Centre for Development and Environment. His body of work had made critical examinations of police-military transformations, market-based conservation, wind energy development and extractive projects, including coal mining in Germany and copper mining in Peru. His current research “investigates the formation of  transnational-super grids and the connections between conventional and renewable  extraction industries.” His work is fresh and insightful, drawn from fieldwork and lived experiences on the frontlines of extractive projects. He highlights some of the ways that renewable energy can also be extractive and exposes the greenwashing that can happen with renewable energy projects. Alexander joined us at the 2020 EXALT Digital Symposium as a plenary panelist in a panel that explored the meaning and use of the term extractivism and will join us as guest on the January 2021 edition of the EXALT podcast.

PUBLICATION ANOUNCEMENT: Agroforestry transitions: The good, the bad and the ugly

By Ossi I. Ollinaho and Markus Kröger (Published in The Journal of Rural Studies)

Abstract: “This article canvasses the current definitions and framings of “agroforestry” in different academic literature and policies. Three key framings of “agroforestry” are identified in the scholarship and explored for their differences. The findings suggest that the distinct schools of research on “agroforestry” focus on distinct points of departure, and these baseline situations from which transitions to what is called “agroforestry” occur vary in distinct ways from monoculture plantations to primary forests. Political-economic analysis is used to scrutinize three key “agroforestry” transition categories: agroecological, agribusiness, and forest degradation, which the article identifies as agroecoforestry (the good), agrobizforestry (the bad), and agrodeforestry (the ugly) transitions, respectively. Examples of each type are provided based on field research in Brazil, and the results are put into a global perspective. The categories are helpful in identifying the “agroforestry” transitions that are currently marketed as good solutions but might also have negative impacts and in highlighting the agroecological agroforestry transitions that would help simultaneously increase global food production, adapt to and mitigate the climate crisis, and achieve equity and social justice.” https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2021.01.016 

Read the full open-access article here.

PUBLICATION ANOUNCEMENT: Unity on the Global Left: Critical Reflections on Samir Amin's Call for a New International

Edited by Barry K. Gills and Christopher Chase-Dunn

“This book brings together a collection of essays by progressive global activists in response to Samir Amin’s call for a new global organization of progressive workers and peoples. Amin’s proposal is applauded, criticized and reformulated by these scholar-activists who are all proponents of ways forward toward a more egalitarian world society.

Samir Amin, a leading scholar and co-founder of the world-system tradition, died on August 12, 2018. Just before his death, he published, along with close allies, a call for ‘workers and the people’ to establish a ‘fifth international’ to coordinate support for progressive movements. Amin, an Egyptian economist, was an intrepid intellectual and organizer of popular movements whose scholar activism provided inspiration to the global justice movement. The essays in this volume are by other prominent scholar activists who praise, critique and reconfigure Amin’s proposal in order to help humanity confront the contemporary crisis of global capitalism and move toward a more egalitarian global society. The chapters in this book were originally published in the journal, Globalizations.” (From the Routledge webpage)

Link to Unity on the Global Left and the Rethinking Globalizations Book Series

PROJECT ANNOUCEMENT: Worlds in Transition

Led by Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes

“This blog/podcast focuses on the people engaged in building more resilient, localized and regenerative systems for a livable planet. It is a platform that give grassroots organisations a voice and a possibility to connect with one another. As more and more people take their first steps towards radically changing their lives, this collection of stories of transitions makes up a larger narrative on how new worlds are born from below, one story at a time.

The podcast is part of the Academy of Finland research project Organising from the grassroots – territorial movements and their role in building sustainable futures lead by Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes, Assistant Professor at Hanken School of Economics. The project has also received funding from the Swedish Culture Foundation and Ella and Georg Ehrnrooth’s foundation.” (From the Worlds in Transition webpage)

Listen to the newest pod with Ian McSweeney, who is the director of Agrarian Land Trust, an organization that works to bring farms into community-centered ownership and equitable lease tenure. 

Listen to the pods in English and the pods in Swedish

CONFERENCE SESSION: Global Extractivisms Roundtable at International Studies Association Annual Convention # ISA2021

Join us on Thursday, April 8th - 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM EDT for a roundtable discussion on Global Extractivisms during the ISA Annual Meeting. This will be a rousing discussion and exploration of global extractivisms. The panelists study the extractive nature of renewable energy megaprojects, agroforestry, world politics, resistance to extractivisms, and data/intellectual extractivism. This is a discussion not to be missed! Panelist in the session include:

Look at the full website and program for #ISA2021. There will be many interesting sessions!

CONFERENCE SESSION: Extractivisms and Alternatives Session at Sustainability Science Days 2021

Tuesday, May 18, 2021 from 12.15 – 14.00 EEST

Session Description: The session is robust exploration of renewables, recycling, and new tech developments that could help to address the current forms of destructive and unsustainable extraction of raw materials. The session will create opportunities for dialogue and development of common vocabularies across disciplines. The conveners of this session come from diverse backgrounds including the social sciences, business, and engineering. We welcome a collaborative approach to a robust exploration of renewables, recycling, and new tech developments that could help to address the current destructive and unsustainable forms of extraction of raw materials—including, but not limited to, mining, agriculture, forestry. We strive to pave the way for future collaboration and looking at these issues from inter-, trans-, and multidisciplinary perspectives

Session conveners: Associate professor Markus Kröger, Doctoral Student Sophia Hagolani-Albov, Postdoctoral Researcher Ossi Ollinaho (University of Helsinki), and Assistant Professor Annukka Santasalo-Aarnio (Aalto University).

See the full program here. 

EXALT PODCAST

Latest episodes:

Next episode – Our conversation with Alexander Dunlap from University of Oslo will be released on Friday, January 20, 2021. We talked about how “green” are green energy projects and their multiple environmental impacts. In addition, we talked about the concept of the Worldeater. This conversation was so riveting that we are going to release it as a main episode and a bonus episode! Keep your ears open for the bonus!

Dear EXALT-community,

Here we are at the close of 2020. This year has certainly been one for the books! We would like to thank everyone that has been part of the EXALT Activities in 2020, including the Symposium, the podcast, and our other seminars. If you have missed anything or like to revisit a lecture, please remember that the recordings are available on our webpage. We hope that everyone has a safe and happy winter holidays. Below please find the latest news and events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Please feel welcome to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT: Concurrent Crises and Sustainable Futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives 

Oc­to­ber 25 -27, 2021, Helsinki, Fin­land

Due to the corona virus our conference planned for October 2020 was postponed to 2021. As we all know, the global situation continues to evolve with the pandemic. At this point, we hope that we will be able to have a hybrid conference, however, we will be waiting until closer to the conference dates to make final decisions. In any case, even if we have to meet digitally again, we look forward to seeing you on October 25-27 in 2021. We will share more information in early 2021 about how will move forward. Hold this space!

EXALT READING “Fieldnotes from Extractive Frontiers”

The latest EXALT Reading is "Fieldnotes from Extractive Frontiers" by Thea Riofrancos. The piece discusses the challenges for achieving environmental justice when contemporary governance practices are incompatible with the rights of nature and people. It explores questions like, "Who has the power to decide the fate of extractive projects? Who can speak on behalf of Nature, and to what ends? Are flourishing ecosystems and Indigenous rights at odds with “development” or compatible with it? Is the law a tool for liberation or a dead-end route to co-optation?" This essay was written as part of the Question series of the Center for Humans and Nature in Chicago. 

PUBLICATION ANOUNCEMENT: 72 Years of Homemaking in Waiting Zones: Lebanon's “Permanently Temporary” Palestinian Refugee Camps

By Yafa El Masri (Published in Frontiers in Sociology)

Yafa will be joining the EXALT Podcast for an episode in early 2021, this article gives great insight to her topic. Stay tuned for our forthcoming interview! (Image by Yafa El Masri)

Abstract: The “permanently temporary” Palestinian refugee community, present in Lebanon since 1948 with no solution in sight, has the highest rate of abject poverty within all five areas of operation of United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinians in the Near East (UNRWA), and it still occupies the same limited geographic space it did 72 years ago. This harsh reality stems from the refugees’ statelessness but is also worsened by the local conditions imposed by the Lebanese legislation and (non)settlement policy aimed at preventing refugees from becoming permanent. Within this situation, we look at practices of agency enacted by camp dwellers to provide lacking life necessities and improve living conditions in the camps. This paper will identify and analyze coping mechanisms and homemaking practices undertaken by Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, operating within the framework set by Brun and Fábos (2015), which conceptualized home and homemaking for people in protracted displacement through identifying a refugee’s “home, Home and HOME.” Building on Donna Haraway’s concept of situated knowledge, this paper uses data collected from participant observations, interviews, ethnographic and autoethnographic recordings analyzed through the lens of my own positioned rationality as a Palestinian refugee from Lebanon. Further, the paper will explore how Palestinian refugees establish camp spaces as a “home-Home-HOME,” despite their uncertain futures, through vertical expansion of buildings, stories and family bonding, in addition to trading and micro-markets. The paper will also deduce how refugees’ informal coping mechanisms offer a way of strengthening community bonds, making home in those, otherwise, uncomfortable “waiting zones,” and finally, envisioning new ideas for restructuring the camp beyond the rule of formal institutions. https://doi.org/10.3389/fsoc.2020.587063

Read the full open-access article here.

PUBLICATION ANOUNCEMENT: The Commons in an Age of Uncertainty: Decolonizing Nature, Economy, and Society

By Franklin Obeng-Odoom, University of Helsinki

"In the last two hundred years, the earth has increasingly become the private property of a few classes, races, transnational corporations, and nations. Repeated claims about the "tragedy of the commons" and the "crisis of capitalism" have done little to explain this concentration of land, encourage solution-building to solve resource depletion, or address our current socio-ecological crisis.

The Commons in an Age of Uncertainty presents a new explanation, vision, and action plan based on the idea of commoning the land. The book argues that by commoning the land, rather than privatising it, we can develop the foundation for prosperity without destructive growth and address both local and global challenges. Making the land the most fundamental priority of all commons does not only give hope, it also opens the doors to a new world in which economy, environment, and society are decolonised and liberated." (from University of Toronto Press)

Link to University of Toronto Press

CONFERENCE SESSION: Extractivisms and Alternatives Session at Sustainability Science Days 2021

Tuesday, May 18, 2021 from 12.15 – 14.00 EEST

Session Description: The session is robust exploration of renewables, recycling, and new tech developments that could help to address the current forms of destructive and unsustainable extraction of raw materials.

The topic of extractivism is gaining more importance as a new key concept that helps to understand, at a deeper level, the causes of destructive resource extractive projects and overall political economic models built on this extractivist paradigm. There is a growing debate around how to find alternatives to destructive extractive processes, and how to identify and implement alternative ways to provide raw materials and create sustainable livelihoods and production processes. This session will focus on unsustainable extraction practices and the technological and political solutions that stand as alternatives in the face of extractivism. We invite presentations that explore renewables, recycling, new tech developments, and how these measures could be adopted to ameliorate the problems of extractivism. We want to explore the political, economic, and socio-environmental factors that could impede or support the adoption of these potential alternatives.

The session will create opportunities for dialogue and development of common vocabularies across disciplines. The conveners of this session come from diverse backgrounds including the social sciences, business, and engineering. We welcome a collaborative approach to a robust exploration of renewables, recycling, and new tech developments that could help to address the current destructive and unsustainable forms of extraction of raw materials—including, but not limited to, mining, agriculture, forestry. We strive to pave the way for future collaboration and looking at these issues from inter-, trans-, and multidisciplinary perspectives

Session conveners: Associate professor Markus Kröger, Doctoral Student Sophia Hagolani-Albov, Postdoctoral Researcher Ossi Ollinaho (University of Helsinki), and Assistant Professor Annukka Santasalo-Aarnio (Aalto University)

See the full program and register for the event now at www.sustainabilitysciencedays.fi

PUBLICATION: Co-Creating Agroecological Symbioses (AES) for Sustainable Food System Networks

By Juha Helenius, Sophia E. Hagolani-Albov, and Koppelmäki (published in Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems)

This open access article introduces a proposal for an alternative food system design that addresses the relationships between producer, processors, and consumers. "[Networks of Agroecological Symbiosis] NAES gives the promise for increased food sovereignty and resilience in terms of food security. It gives promise for transformative change from extractive food capitalism toward sustainable ecology-based food systems." (Helenius et al. 2020). https://doi.org/10.3389/fsufs.2020.588715

Read the full article here.

EXALT PODCAST – LATEST EPISODES

Latest episodes:

  • November 2020 - Katherine Trebeck - Should the economy work for society and the environment?
  • October 2020 - Markus Kröger - What is the Best Way to Push for Change?
  • September 2020 - Anja Nygren - How Does Extractivism Impact Frontier Families Over Generations?
  • August 2020 - Gutu Olana Wayessa - Why do people need to be consulted about big projects in their back yards?

Next episode - In light of Christmas Day, this episode will be released on Thursday, December 24th. In January we will be back to our normal release schedule of the last Friday of the month. In this episode we are joined by Trade Union Josua Mata, who we met through our partners at the People's Sovereignty Network. We will be learning about the role of labor unions in resistance struggles in the Philippines.

Dear EXALT-community,

We hope everyone is doing well despite the turbulent times. Please find below the latest news and hear about events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Feel free to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

SESSION RECORDINGS FROM DOCTORAL STUDENTS PRE-CONFERENCE in October 2020 “(De)naturalising extractivism: investigating its social orders and resistances”

Prior to the EXALT Symposium last October, EXALT partnered with two doctoral programs from the Faculty Social Sciences at the University of Helsinki to coproduce an online annual conference as a pre-conference to the Symposium. The 7th Annual Conference for the Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences & the Doctoral Programme in Political, Societal and Regional Change explored the (de)naturalisations of extractivist practices. The session recordings can be found below, as well as on the EXALT website and EXALT’s Youtube-channel.

EXALT READING: Alternative Futures: India Unshackled

Read the latest: “Alternative Futures: India Unshackled”, (edited by KJ Joy & Ashish Kothari) which brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. This open access book covers a wide range of issues and is a must-read for those interested in envisioning better futures for all. Previous: The previous EXALT Reading is an article published on the Journal Globalizations. Steve Keen's "The Appallingly Bad Neoclassical Economics of Climate Change" offers devastating critique of neoclassical climate economics and shows how lot of the research dramatically underestimates and misinterprets the risk of climate emergency. "If climate change does lead to the catastrophic outcomes that some scientists now openly contemplate, then these Neoclassical economists will be complicit in causing the greatest crisis, not merely in the history of capitalism, but potentially in the history of life on Earth."

PUBLICATION: ORGANISING IN DEFENCE OF LIFE: THE EMERGENCE AND DYNAMICS OF A TERRITORIAL MOVEMENT IN SOUTHERN CHILE

By Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes (Published on the Journal Organization)

The aim of this paper is to examine how territorial movements, as distinct forms of place-based social movements, organise in defence of life against the threat of resource extraction on their land. Based on the experiences of Indigenous Lafkenche-Mapuche members of a protracted struggle against a pulp mill in southern Chile, the study seeks to address the following research questions: (1) How do territorial movements emerge and organise the defence of their threatened lives? and (2) How do diverging (Indigenous and non-Indigenous) territorial relations shape the dynamics of the struggle? Combining insights from Enrique Dussel’s ‘ethics of liberation’ with that of Indigenous ontologies, this study suggests that territorial movements emerge out of the awakening of a critical consciousness of the threat of death and the collective ‘desire to live’ that define the dynamics of the struggle. The findings demonstrate how the diverging territorial relations, the societally embedded ‘coloniality of power’, and the state and corporate induced violence shape the movement dynamics. Changes in the movement dynamics also occur as a result of the struggle itself, as the movement actors’ unified desire to live continuously transforms the people and shapes the territory they inhabit. DOI: 10.1177/1350508420963871

Read the full article here.

PUBLICATION: ALLI KAWSAY: EPISTEMOLOGY AND POLITICAL PRACTICE IN THE TERRITORIES, A POSSIBILITY FROM THE ANDEAN PLURIVERSE FOR ECOLOGICAL JUSTICE AND THE CARE OF MOTHER NATURE

By Eduardo Erazo Acosta (Chapter in The Palgrave Handbook of Climate Resilient Societies pp 1-17)

Indigenous communities are noted for being resilient. The following presentation is an epistemological-political action from the world of possibilities in the pluriverse of indigenous knowledge. The Alli Kawsay (Buen Vivir) and its political, cultural, and epistemic options offer the possibility to work collectively in favor of our ‘Mother Nature.’ From the urgent options to be heard in the current climate crisis and even more in the sociopolitical crisis, it is essential to strengthen respect for Mother Nature. This document arises from learning in indigenous communities in walking and listening to indigenous talk in the Andean region in high Andean and Amazonian communities. Presented here are elements of the rights of nature. The Alli Kawsay is an option to be lived urgently now, as a serious and fundamental option that originates from ancestral knowledge, is lived by millions in the global south, and that today is taken up again at the global level by activists and people aware of the care of nature as a subject of rights in the international political framework.

Full chapter here.

NEWS PIECE ON THE FIRST YEAR OF THE EXALT PODCAST: “Popularising research on extractivism and its alternatives”

Published on the University of Helsinki’s website

In celebration of the one year anniversary of the EXALT Podcast a brief news piece was published on the EXALT website on the podcast’s first year and the significance of approachable communication of research. “From large-scale mining, to eco-cultural pluralism, and harmful forms of conservation, the EXALT Podcast offers listeners, activists, and academics a space to explore and discuss the multiple ways extractivism shapes our world today and the possibilities for alternatives.”

Read the full article here.

PUBLICATION: ECONOMICS AND CLIMATE EMERGENCY

By professors Barry Gills & Jamie Morgan (published in Globalizations)

In this article professor Barry Gills (Global Development Studies, University of Helsinki) and professor Jamie Morgan (Leeds Beckett University) provide introductory comment for the collection of solicited essays on Economics and Climate Emergency published as a collection on the Journal Globalizations, and all of which are open access until the end of the year. In the article Gills and Morgan suggest that recent critique of the climate movement has broader systemic significance and this is indicative of issues that bear on the collected essays. This article is to rehearse some of the standard arguments leading to complacency and delay to action on climate change and ecological breakdown. DOI:10.1080/14747731.2020.1841527

Read the full article here.

EXALT PODCAST – LATEST EPISODES

Latest episodes:

Dear EXALT-community,

Please find below the latest news and hear about events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Feel free to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

EXALT SYMPOSIUM 2020 – SESSION RECORDINGS

EXALT Symposium 2020 was a series of convivial and critical online discussions, which took place online in the end of October, 2020. The event brought together scholars and activists in discussing the diverse phenomena of global extractivisms and the myriad alternatives. The Symposium consisted of a plenary Roundtable Discussion followed by seven thematic sessions with a diverse set of speakers. The session recordings can be found below, as well as on the EXALT website and EXALT’s Youtube-channel.

WATCH THE RECORDINGS:

EXALT READING

Read the latest: This week's EXALT Reading is an article published on Globalizations. Steve Keen's "The Appallingly Bad Neoclassical Economics of Climate Change" offers some devastating critique of neoclassical climate economics and shows how lot of the research dramatically underestimates and misinterprets the risk of climate emergency. “If climate change does lead to the catastrophic outcomes that some scientists now openly contemplate, then these Neoclassical economists will be complicit in causing the greatest crisis, not merely in the history of capitalism, but potentially in the history of life on Earth.” Previous: Routledge Handbook of Climate Justice (edited by Tahseen Jafry). The book addresses some of the most important topics in current climate justice research, including just transition, urban climate justice and public engagement, in addition to the more traditional focus on gender, international governance and climate ethics. The book draws from a multidisciplinary group of authors and provides valuable insights into the timely and crucial topic. Whether you are a student, researcher or come from outside of academia, this topic is relevant for everyone!

UPCOMING BOOK: “IRON WILL - GLOBAL EXTRACTIVISM AND MINING RESISTANCE IN BRAZIL AND INDIA”

By Markus Kröger (The University of Michigan Press)

To be published in November, 2020, new book by Markus Kröger (Associate Professor of Global Development Studies at the University of Helsinki) “Iron Will” lays bare the role of extractivist policies and the efforts to resist these policies through a deep ethnographic exploration of globally important iron ore mining in Brazil and India. Markus Kröger addresses resistance strategies to extractivism and tracks their success, or lack thereof, through a comparison of peaceful and armed resource conflicts, explaining how different means of resistance arise. Using the distinctly different contexts and political systems of Brazil and India highlights the importance of local context for resistance. For example, if there is an armed conflict at a planned mining site, how does this influence the possibility to use peaceful resistance strategies? To answer such questions, Kröger assesses the inter-relations of contentious, electoral, institutional, judicial, and private politics that surround conflicts and interactions, offering a new theoretical framework of 'investment politics' that can be applied generally by scholars and students of social movements, environmental studies, and political economy, and even more broadly in Social Scientific and Environmental Policy research.

EXALT PODCAST CELEBRATES ITS ONE-YEAR-ANNIVERSARY

In celebration of the one year anniversary of the EXALT Podcast two new episodes were published in October! In the first episode the hosts Christopher Chagnon and Sophia Hagolani-Albov talked with associate professor Markus Kröger (Global Development Studies at the University of Helsinki, a founding member of EXALT, and a research fellow at the Academy of Finland) about the best ways to achieve change, as well as Kröger’s upcoming book "Iron Will". In the episode Kröger shares some of his stories of being a participant observer in the front lines of mining resistance in India and Brazil. In the Bonus Episode the hosts sat down to look back to the last year, the guests they’ve had and to see what's coming ahead next year in season two!  

Latest episodes:

  • Bonus: Year 1 Retrospective (and Outtakes)
  • Markus Kröger – What is the Best way to Push for Change?
  • Anja Nygren - How Does Extractivism Impact Frontier Families Over Generations?
  • Gutu Olana Wayessa - Why do people need to be consulted about big projects in their back yards?
  • Will LaFleur – What kind of connection do you have with your food?
  • Rachel Mazac – How does your dinner impact the world?
  • Maija Lassila - Extractivism Research and Breaking Away from the Written Word

The EXALT Podcast publishes monthly episodes focused on the themes of extractivisms and alternatives. Our guests come from academics, activism, and lived experience. A new conversation will be posted every month. Listen to us on Apple Podcast, Spotify, SoundCloud, Anchor, Google Podcasts, Breaker or RadioPublic.

ESSAY – BEYOND “KOYAANISQATSI”: REIMAGINING CIVILIZATION

By professor Barry Gills (ISA Global DialogueVolume 10, Issue 3)

In this short essay professor Barry Gills (Global Development Studies, University of Helsinki) discusses the concurrent global crises and the state of the world through the Hopi –concept of “Koyaanisqatsi”.

“There is an emerging view in the present crisis, illustrated in recently burgeoning commentary across the globe, expressing a realization that our present form of world order and civilization has brought humanity and “nature” into a great crisis, and that we must act radically to transform the foundations. The combination, or “triple crisis,” of the three Cs – Climate, Capitalism, and COVID-19 – has brought forward a momentum to address the fundamental causes of this crisis. The Hopi people of North America have an important myth with great relevance for our present situation: the myth of “Koyaanisqatsi,” often translated as “life out of balance,” “a form of life that should not exist,” or “a crazy life.”

Read the full essay here.

CALL FOR TWO POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHERS (Justice and Politics in Global Bioeconomy)

Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke)

“In the frame of JUST GLOBE, we are looking for two postdoctoral researchers to conduct critical, theoretical and qualitative research on bioeconomy policy, conflicts, justice and power relations in Ghana and Laos (one postdoc per country). The research will take part in environmental justice debates by providing understanding about the felt justice and injustice within the particular studied environments. The postdoctoral researchers are expected to carry out fieldworks in the case study countries (approximately 3 months) and to have one or two mobility periods with a duration of 1 to 2 months in the collaborating institutions or another relevant institution. The positions are with a duration of 1,5 years (18 months).”

About the project: JUST GLOBE: Justice in Global Bioeconomy project (2020-2025) is a project funded by the Academy of Finland. ”In JUST GLOBE we focus on Power, Politics and Environmental Justice in the context of Global Bioeconomy. We analyze how transitions to bioeconomy relate to and affect the existing socio-ecological injustices and power asymmetries and what kind of collaboration and conflicts emerge between those who do not share similar aspirations, worldviews and interests. In order to understand how the exercise of power and the calls for justice interact and shape the becoming of bioeconomy in its different forms and across different scales, the project combines policy analysis and ethnographic investigations of lived experiences.”

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - Organizing for a Living Earth: Beyond Human-centered Analyses of Organization and Management

We warmly invite you to submit your abstract to our sub-theme #56 “Organizing for a Living Earth: Beyond Human-centered Analyses of Organization and Management" taking place in the upcoming EGOS conference in July 2021. We call for contributions engaging with diverse approaches and methodologies that explore and theorize organizational practices involving how people, together with other living beings and things, co-construct an (un)livable earth. We are interested in the relations, senses and emotions that ‘glue’ people together with soils, nonhuman animals, microorganisms in socio-bio-material processes that enable a living and thriving earth. Such contributions could, for example, be informed by ecological economics, ecofeminism, post-structural philosophy, world-ecology theory, science and technology studies, practice theories, and others. While theory is clearly of interest to us, we are also encouraging empirical investigations and practical cases that vividly engage with exploring multiple ways of re-organizing the economy in the era of ecological crisis.

More information on the conference and the full call for papers can be found here.

Dear EXALT-community,

Please find below the latest news and hear about future events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Feel free to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

EXALT SYMPOSIUM 2020 – EXTRACTIVISMS AND ALTERNATIVES

October 21.-23. – Online 

EXALT Symposium 2020 is a series of convivial and critical online discussions, taking place next month on 21.-23. of October, 2020. The event draws together diverse critical analyses of the phenomena of global extractivisms and the myriad alternatives pursued both in theory and practice. The Symposium consists of a plenary Roundtable Discussion and six sessions with diverse set of speakers from multiple backgrounds. Read about our speakers and check out the program on our website! The event is free and registration is open for everyone.

EXALT READING

Read the latest: This week's EXALT Reading is about just cities and inclusive urban spaces. The full issue "Cities of Inclusion—Spaces of Justice" edited by professor Anja Nygren and Dr. Florencia Quesada proposes new ways of rethinking cities so they can become places where all the citizens feel included. The Special issue explores new theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to understanding the complex inequalities characteristic of contemporary cities, and emergent initiatives for enhancing the rights to the city, societal security and urban justice.

Previous: "Between Activism and Science: grassroots concepts for sustainability" by Joan Martinez-Alier et al. The article shows how various environmental justice organizations and activists have introduced new concepts to political ecology, which have then been taken up by academics and policy makers. These concepts include environmental justice, environmental racism, climate justice, biopiracy, food sovereignty, land grabbing, corporate accountability, ecocide, and indigenous territorial rights, among others.

PUBLICATION: “THE POTENTIAL OF AMAZON INDIGENOUS AGROFORESTRY PRACTICES AND ONTOLOGIES FOR RETHINKING GLOBAL FOREST GOVERNANCE”

By Markus Kröger and Nidia Catherine González in Forest Policy and Economics

This article by associate professor Markus Kröger and Dr. Nidia Catherine González explores the potential of Amazon indigenous agroforestry practices and forest understandings for making global forest governance more nuanced and thus rethinking the value of forests in the context of multiple global crises. Indigenous forest practices and their inherent knowledge are included in current global governance in very limited ways. Onto-epistemological openings in forest policies are needed in the face of converging climate, food and health crises. The indigenous forest relations and practices analyzed here may offer possibilities for such onto-epistemological openings. 

Read the article here.

PUBLICATION: “CORPORATE LAND GRABS: COLONIAL CONTINUITY AND SPACE OF EXCEPTION IN KENYA”

by Paola Minoia in Land Use Policy

This article by Dr. Paola Minoia discusses plantations and landgrabs as continuity of #colonial structures in contemporary agribusiness in Kenya. The article focuses on land dispossession instigated by large corporations, and the way they produce spaces of colonial persistence through particular structures and sovereignty systems that differ from the state-based administrative settings in which they are located. The study looks at phenomena that can be observed on large agricultural estates, particularly in the Teita sisal plantation in Taita-Taveta county in Kenya. 

Read the article here.

PUBLICATION: “RECLAIMING DEMOCRACY FROM BELOW: FROM THE CONTEMPORARY STATE CAPITALIST SYSTEM TO PEOPLES’ SOVEREIGNTY”

Special Forum published on Globalizations Journal - Edited by Nora McKeon and Gonzalo Berrón

This Special Forum of Globalizations co-edited by Nora McKeon and Gonzalo Berrón grows from a collective effort to assess the deep changes underway in the world in a dialogue between specific struggles on the ground to defend rights and territories and the dynamics of the global trends that impact on them all. Behind what can look like fragmented battles and constructions, we hypothesize, there is an increasingly consolidated common struggle and vision, just as a mosaic is composed of separate pieces that are unified into a composition. Based on exchanges in a workshop in Siena in October 2018, the Forum aims at putting together some of the pieces of the mosaic.

Content:

1. Introduction – Nora McKeon and Gonzalo Berrón

2. Contextualizing corporate control in the agrifood and extractive sectors – Jennifer Clapp and Joseph  Purugganan

3. Land, territory and commons: voices and visions from struggles – Tomaso Ferrando, Isa Alvarez, Molly Anderson, Sophie Dowllar, Harriet Friedmann, Antonio Gonzalez, Chandra Maracle, Nora McKeon

4. Rethinking law from below: experiences from the Kuna People and Rojava - Felipe Bley Folly in dialogue with Manigueuigdinapi Jorge Stanley Icaza, Havin Guneser and others

5. Knowledge and education for people’s sovereignty - Molly Anderson and Priscilla Settee;

6. Releasing the full transformative power of feminism - Zdravka Dimitrova, Isa Álvarez, Sophie Dowllar, Havin Guneser

PUBLICATION: OXFORD BIBLIOGRAPHIES

1.    Natural Resources, Energy Politics, and Environmental Consequences

2.    Politics of Extraction: Theories and New Concepts for Critical Analysis

By Markus Kröger

EXALT researcher associate professor Markus Kröger has published two entries on the Oxford Bibliographies, offering authoritative research guides on 1. Natural Resources, Energy Politics, and Environmental Consequences and 2. [on the] Politics of Extraction: Theories and New Concepts for Critical Analysis. These publications can provide researchers and students valuable resources and an overview of the current literature on the subjects.

Oxford Bibliographies Online is unfortunately available only by subscription and perpetual access to institutions. For more information visit their website.

LISTEN TO THE EXALT PODCAST

The EXALT Podcast publishes monthly episodes focused on the themes of extractivisms and alternatives. Our guests come from academics, activism, and lived experience. A new conversation will be posted every month. Listen to us on SoundCloudApple PodcastSpotifyAnchorGoogle PodcastsBreaker or RadioPublic.

Latest episodes:

COLLABORATION: PEOPLE’S SOVEREIGNTY LAB

EXALT is joining forces with The People’s Sovereignty Lab at the EXALT Fall Symposium 20202. The People’s Sovereignty Lab will organize a scientific session on Thursday 22nd of October at 16.-18.00 (EEST) with Nora McKeon and Gonzalo Berrón hosting the event.

The People’s Sovereignty Network is a mosaic of scholars and activists responding to a felt need to break out of silos, to converge and strategize around common threats and aspirations, and to build shared popular narratives rooted in the concrete experiences of communities around the world.

Dear EXALT-community,

Please find below the latest news and hear about future events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Feel free to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

INTERVIEW IN THE RETHINKING-SERIES (EXTINCTION REBELLION FINLAND)

EXALT members, professor Barry Gills and postdoctoral researcher Ossi Ollinaho have each taken part in an interview-series “Rethinking”, by the Finnish Extinction Rebellion, Elokapina. Professor Gills discussed rethinking global restoration in times of concurrent crises (in English) and Dr. Ollinaho talked about the potential of alternative worldviews against the rampant environmental and climate crisis (in Finnish).

Watch the two interviews on XR Finland’s Youtube-channel:

NEW EXALT READING

Read the latest: David Wallace-Wells' article "The Uninhabitable World", a synthesis of the book by the same name, which tackles the current path our world is on due to climate-breakdown. The article is not an uplifting one, but exactly for that reason, even more necessary for everyone to read. The piece is one of the most-read article's in history of the New York Magazine and features a link to an annotated version, to give readers some context on how the article was reported and further sources for the information. Even if it scares you, read.

UCOMING EVENT THIS WEEK: GLOBAL EXTRACTION FILM FESTIVAL (NOT ORGANIZED BY EXALT)

Streaming Online | July 16-20, 2020 | #FocusOnGlobalExtraction | #GlobalExtractionAction

From 16-20 July 2020, Jamaican environmental filmmaker Esther Figueroa (Vagabond Media), in collaboration with https://www.caribbeancreativity.nl/https://www.caribbeancreativity.nl/, is hosting a free online film festival to reflect on the destructive impacts of hundreds of years of extractive industries on Planet Earth.

FOCUS ON GLOBAL EXTRACTION – PROGRAM 1:

Program 1 features a selection of 25 documentaries focused on all the regions of the world, with a wide range of topics demonstrating the all-encompassing and intersectional nature of global extraction and exploitation. From the military industrial complex and colonial occupation, to mining, tourism, industrial agriculture, factory farms, climate crisis, plastics, waste, forests, soil, forced labor, fossil fuels, and smart-technology.

LISTEN TO THE EXALT PODCAST

The EXALT Podcast publishes monthly episodes focused on the themes of extractivisms and alternatives. Our guests come from academics, activism, and lived experience. A new conversation will be posted every month. Listen to us on SoundCloudApple PodcastSpotifyAnchor, Google PodcastsBreaker or RadioPublic.

Latest episodes:

  • Will LaFleur – What kind of connection do you have with your food?
  • Rachel Mazac – How does your dinner impact the world?
  • Maija Lassila - Extractivism Research and Breaking Away from the Written Word
  • Tom Maraffa – Extractivism and sense of place in Ohio
  • Katy Machoa and Paola Minoia – Eco-cultural pluralism, Extractivism, and the Kichwa people of Ecuadorain Amazonia
  • Sanna Komi – Conservation and Extractivism: Two sides of the same coin
  • Maria Fuentes-Ehrnström – Exploring the Pluriverse
  • Aili Pyhälä – Activisms, Academia and Alternatives
  • Barry Gills – Extractivisms and Alternatives; Three concepts to live by; Call for Action

Dear EXALT-community,

Please find below the latest news and hear about future events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). Feel free to distribute this newsletter to your own respective networks.  

EXALT SYMPOSIUM 2020 in October – a reminder

EXALT is hosting an online event, EXALT Symposium 2020 - Extractivisms and Alternatives, which will be held in October 21-23, 2020. The online symposium will be a series of convivial discussions on different aspects of extractivisms and alternatives, featuring a roundtable discussion with some of the world’s leading scholars working on extractivisms.

Please visit our website for more information and stay tuned on our social media channels to hear more about the upcoming Symposium!

QUARANTINE READING IS NOW EXALT READING

EXALT Reading (formerly Quarantine Reading) is a curated list of open access, topical and critical literature on Extractivism, Global Crises, Alternatives, Sustainability, Degrowth, Solidarity, Commons and everything in between! The literature-picks are posted biweekly on EXALT's Facebook-page and updated on the website regularly.

Read the latest: Professor Hamed Hosseini's essay "From well-being to well-living: Towards a post-capitalist understanding of quality of life" published on our partner-organization’s Common Alternatives website. The ten-minute-read discusses how well-being is understood in different contexts and how the discussion has the potential to make way for post-capitalist transformations towards convivial ways to live and be well.

PAST EVENT: “DEGROWTH AND POST-EXTRACTIVISM – A GOOD LIFE FOR ALL?”

On June 5th at 14.00-15.30 (EEST) EXALT and HELSUS Global South Encounters seminar series organized an online seminar “Degrowth and Post-Extractivisms – a Good Life for All?” as part of the Global Degrowth Day. The event hosted a discussion with Dr. Marta Conde (Pompeu Fabra University), a prominent researcher in the field of post-extractivism and Degrowth. The discussion dealt with the promises and challenges of Degrowth and examined the potential of and the need for post-extractivist realities. Dr. Conde also talked about her research on activism mobilizing science and touched upon the discussion around the EU Green Deal. We want to thank everyone who participated in the event! If you missed the event this time, you can watch it via the link below.

Watch the event-recording here.

LISTEN TO THE EXALT PODCAST

The EXALT Podcast publishes monthly episodes focused on the themes of extractivisms and alternatives. Our guests come from academics, activism, and lived experience. A new conversation will be posted every month. Listen to us on SoundCloudApple PodcastSpotifyAnchorGoogle PodcastsBreaker or RadioPublic.

Latest episodes:

  • Rachel Mazac – How does your dinner impact the world?
  • Maija Lassila - Extractivism Research and Breaking Away from the Written Word
  • Tom Maraffa – Extractivism and sense of place in Ohio
  • Katy Machoa and Paola Minoia – Eco-cultural pluralism, Extractivism, and the Kichwa people of Ecuadorain Amazonia
  • Sanna Komi – Conservation and Extractivism: Two sides of the same coin
  • Maria Fuentes-Ehrnström – Exploring the Pluriverse
  • Aili Pyhälä – Activisms, Academia and Alternatives
  • Barry Gills – Extractivisms and Alternatives; Three concepts to live by; Call for Action

 

Dear EXALT-community,

Please find below the latest news and hear about future events organized by the Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT). You are welcome to forward the information to your respective networks.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS IS OPEN FOR EXALT CONFERENCE OCTOBER 20-23, 2020, UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI

The upcoming conference "Concurrent crisis and sustainable futures: Global Extractivisms and Alternatives" is a two day conference with six scientific sessions (themes below), organized at the University of Helsinki on 20-23 of October. The conference aims to catalyze and facilitate inter- and transdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration, and therefore welcomes proposals from researchers of all academic career-levels. One of the goals of the conference is to contribute to, expand, and deepen the concept of extractivism and the role of alternatives beyond the conventional usage connected to natural resources. Instructions for submission.

Thematic tracks:

  1. Global Extractivisms
  2. Indigenous Sovereignty, Modernity projects and Alternatives
  3. Urbanity and Extractivisms
  4. Financialisation and Intellectual Extractivisms
  5. Transitions to Alternatives
  6. Open theme

UPCOMING EVENT: “CLIMATE EMERGENCY AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN THE ARCTIC”

March 12th, 2020 at 13.00, Think Corner

This panel discussion will tackle the situations of Indigenous peoples in the changing Arctic, how livelihoods have started to alter and what roles does extractivism play with its myriad of direct and indirect consequences for the well-being of the Arctic. The panel offers a forum for Indigenous representatives and researchers to offer insights on the complex entanglement of climate emergency, Indigenous people’s sovereignty and Arctic extractivism. It also addresses the questions of future generations and  the Anthropocene from the perspective of Arctic Indigenous peoples. The event is co-organized by The Global Extractivisms and Alternatives Initiative (EXALT), the Indigenous Studies programme at the University of Helsinki and All-Youth research project funded by the Strategic Research Council (SRC).

Speakers:

  • Dmitry Arzyutov – Researcher at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm
  • Hanna Guttorm – Researcher of Indigenous Studies at the University of Helsinki, INEQ and HELSUS
  • Third speaker will be announced shortly.

Event’s facebook-page.

LISTEN TO THE EXALT PODCAST

EXALT is committed to science popularization and communication. In support of this goal we developed the EXALT Podcast focused on the themes of extractivisms and alternatives. Our guests come from academics, activism, and lived experience. A new conversation will be posted every month. Listen to us on SoundCloudApple PodcastSpotifyAnchorGoogle PodcastsBreaker or RadioPublic.

Latest episodes:

  • Katy Machoa and Paola Minoia – Eco-cultural pluralism, Extractivism, and the Kichwa people of Ecuadorain Amazonia
  • Sanna Komi – Conservation and Extractivism: Two sides of the same coin
  • Maria Fuentes-Ehrnström – Exploring the Pluriverse
  • Aili Pyhälä – Activisms, Academia and Alternatives
  • Barry Gills – Extractivisms and Alternatives; Three concepts to live by; Call for Action

PAST EVENT: (RE)PURPOSING THE UNIVERSITY TO TACKLE THE CLIMATE EMERGENCY

On January 16th EXALT and HELSUS organized an event at Think Corner to discuss how to repurpose the University of Helsinki to tackle the climate emergency. You can watch the video of the entire event through this link. Watch the recording of Professor Barry Gills’ talk at the event on EXALT’s Youtube channel.

“EXTRACTIVISM – NEW AND RISING FIELD OF RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI” Article published on the University of Helsinki’s website, written by Saana Hokkanen

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE.