Research interests

  • Structuralism and narratology 
  • World-systems theory 
  • 'World literature' 
  • Utopian imaginary

Current research

Alternative Communities: Irrealist Tropes and the Collective Imaginary on the Literary Semi-Periphery of Europe

My research focuses on the emerging field of world-literature (understood in world-systemic terms) and explores imaginaries of social organisation and collective action in literatures on the European peripheries. This and other (semi-)peripheral regions of the world-system formerly part of the so-called Second Worldare usually glossed over in the popular analytical oppositions of Western/postcolonial or North/South. However, their comparative examination in world-literary terms and outside the usual confines of area studies can nuance the existing theories of literary history and cultural analysis and perhaps even show how these literatures productively intervene into the current crisis of political imagination. Two guiding aims of my research are, first, to give an analysis of the semi-peripheral collective imaginary, as it is captured, for example, in post-1990 Ukrainian, Belarusian, Hungarian and Estonian literary production; second, with this analysis to contribute to the on-going search for new Utopias and, more prosaically, to a rethinking of the scope and direction of literary and cultural theories.

Short bio

I work in the field of language, literature and culture. Since my Ph.D. (Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany) I have been interested in the possibilities of narrative expression of an enunciatively plural collective voice. My monograph on we-narratives is forthcoming with the Ohio State University Press. More recently, my research focus has shifted from narratology and Anglophone fiction to world-literature, comparative morphology, alternative futures and modes of social existence which fascinate the (semi-)peripheral literary imagination. Prior to HCAS I worked on these topics with support from the German Research Foundation (DFG), Kone Foundation and Alfred Kordelin Foundation.

Research interests

  • Democratic activism
  • Oral history
  • Transnational and global ethnography

Current research

Democratic Alternatives: Oral History, Civil Society and the Practices of Pluralism

In 1980s Yugoslav Macedonia, civic discourse flourished as citizens tested new forms of transformative political engagement. The subsequent wars in Croatia, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Kosovo have largely overwritten this moment: the lively debates, strikes and protests of the time have been largely forgotten, marginalized, or framed as examples of external agitation rather than home-grown activism.  Drawing mainly on conversations with those directly involved, the project first asks the question why these events have been largely dismissed in the national and international narrative of Macedonian history: and second, seeks to show what benefits for contemporary civil discourse a closer examination of this period could yield. At the broader level, the book will also make the case for the value of critical oral history as a core methodology in interdisciplinary studies of democratic activism.

Short bio

Keith Brown is professor of politics and global studies at Arizona State University, where he also serves as director of the Melikian Center for Russian, Eurasian and East European Studies. His research and teaching focus on the Western Balkans in global context, exploring in particular alternatives to violence, and the power of citizen activism.

Research interests

  • Posthumanism
  • Material feminism
  • Environmental Posthumanities

Current research

Rethinking the Human: Posthuman Vulnerability and its Ethical Potential

My project will advance the paradigm shift initiated by posthumanist material feminism that rejects the conception of the human as exceptional and the dualisms at the foundation of humanist thinking. I will contribute to new theorizations that put the human back in its world and in relation with others, human and nonhuman, in order to better conceptualize those relations. Ultimately, my aim is to demonstrate that our ontological vulnerability ought to be embraced rather than rejected since it is the only way in which we can fully flourish. I will investigate how vulnerability can: (a) undo the self through negative interconnections, such as trauma, but also, and most importantly, (b) promote ethical growth by enhancing the self through positive interconnections, such as better mutual and respectful ecological relations.

Short bio

Christine Daigle is professor of philosophy and Director of the Posthumanism Research Institute at Brock University. Her current research explores the concept of posthuman vulnerability and its ethical potential from a posthumanist material feminist point of view. She also works on environmental posthumanities and issues related to the Anthropocene. She has also published extensively on the works of Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir.

Research interests

  • History of life sciences
  • Environmental history
  • Russian Empire / USSR
  • The 19th and the first half of the 20th century

Current research

Red deer and Russian aristocracy in the long 19th century (In cooperation with Dr.habil. Tomasz Samojlik, MRI PAS, Białowieża)

In the frames of the project, we plan to take a closer look at the problem of big mammals surviving in regions with dense human population. The study will focus mainly on red deer Cervus elaphus. This common species came to the brink of extinction in the long 19th century in the European lowlands. The eventual survival of the species depended not on a pristine natural refugium, as in the case of European bison, but rather on the prestige of big game hunts among the aristocracy, in which red deer played a pivotal role. A lot of effort was put by the aristocracy to justify their hunts not as a lap of luxury but rather as a part of cultural heritage, the driving force behind the development of science, or part of the conservation movement. Therefore, within the project we aim at discussing potential side effects and consequences of this type of "conservation for hunting". The main focus of our study is red deer in Białowieża Primeval Forest, supplemented with examples of other species of wild ungulates - roe deer, fallow deer, wild boar, moose, European bison - in different hunting grounds of the Romanovs and other families of the highest aristocracy of the Russian Empire.

Short bio

Anastasia Fedotova is a senior researcher at St. Petersburg Branch of the Institute for the History of Science and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences. She is a historian of science and environmental historian with a primary research focus on the role of scientific knowledge for the rationalisation of agriculture, forestry and game management in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the Russian Empire and the USSR. She has an M.Sc. in plant ecology (2000) and a Ph.D. in history of science (2012). She is a coauthor of "Białowieża Forest in the Nineteenth Century: Nature and Culture published" in 2020 with T.Samojlik, P.Daszkiewicz and I.D.Rotherham.

 

Research interests

  • Russia
  • Ukraine
  • Cultural Memory
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity
  • Literature and Cinema
  • Medieval History
  • Byzantium
  • Textual Criticism

Current research

The Second Baptism of Rus: Cultural Memory After Communism

This project investigates the memory politics of the contemporary Russian Orthodox Church. It documents the complex relations between the Kremlin and the Moscow Patriarchate and uncovers their collaborative efforts to transform cultural memory in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, in the three decades since the disintegration of the USSR. Mikhail Zadornov once described Russia as ‘a great country with an unpredictable past’. The study explores the development of these unpredictable pasts in the post-Soviet period and shows how they are being cultivated in an attempt to legitimize the contemporary Russian political order. "The Second Baptism of Rus" is currently under advanced contract with the "Religion and Conflict Series" at Cornell University Press.

Short bio

Sean Griffin is an interdisciplinary scholar of Russia and Ukraine. His research focuses primarily on the history of the Orthodox Church and its role in the making of cultural memory: from the liturgy and chronicles of medieval Kyiv, to the blockbuster films and digital propaganda of modern Moscow.  Before coming to Finland, Griffin was a postdoctoral fellow in the Society of Fellows at Dartmouth College, as well as a VolkswagenStiftung fellow in Münster, Germany. In 2021-2022, his research in Helsinki will be funded by grants from the Gerda Henkel Stiftung and the American Council of Learned Societies/Luce Foundation.

Research interests

  • Ocean studies/ climate change
  • History of slavery
  • Indenture and Mediterranean migration
  • Colonialism and extractivism

Current research

Land-line

Land-line is a video installation and academic essay exploring the significance of Telegraph Island in Oman in the development of nineteenth century telegraphic land cables between Persia and India, connecting this to extractivist politics in the area. It takes Thani Al Suwaidi’s 1994 novel The Diesel and Charles Edward Stuart’s Through Persia in Disguise: with Reminisces of the Indian Mutiny as points of departure to create a narrative that connects the aspirations of Empire and connectivity to ground level geopolitics, thinking about land, sea, deserts, horsemen. It will be a speculative story that reads reverberations between the politics of communication and extraction in the nineteenth century and those of the present.

Short bio

Ayesha Hameed lives in London, UK. Since 2014 Hameed’s multi-chapter project 'Black Atlantis' has looked at the Black Atlantic and its afterlives in contemporary illegalized migration at sea, in oceanic environments, through Afrofuturistic dancefloors and soundsystems and in outer space. Through videos, audio essays and performance lectures, she examines how to think through sound, image, water, violence and history as elements of an active archive; and time travel as an historical method. Recent exhibitions include Liverpool Biennale (2021), Gothenburg Biennale (2019), Lubumbashi Biennale (2019) and Dakar Biennale (2018). She is co-editor of Futures and Fictions (Repeater 2017) and co-author of Visual Cultures as Time Travel (Sternberg/MIT 2021). She is currently Co-Programme Leader of the PhD in Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths University of London.

 

Research interests

  • International Relations Theory
  • Social Constructivism
  • Identity
  • Habit
  • USSRussia

Current research

While at the Collegium, I will work on a book manuscript, "A Constructivist History of Khrushchev's Cold War, 1958-64." It is a follow-on to the 2012 Oxford University Press book, Reconstructing the Cold War. In the book I explore how predominant discourses of Soviet national identity, both at elite and mass levels, informs Soviet identity relations with the rest of world. In particular, I concentrate on Soviet relations with China, the US, and the decolonizing world. The US and China were significant defining Others for the Soviet elite in this period. Soviet suffering during World War II and continuing de-Stalinization were two cornerstones of Soviet national identity that both affected Soviet relations with the US, the West in general, and China.

Short bio

Ted Hopf has served on the political science faculties of the National University of Singapore, Ohio State University, Ohio University and the University of Michigan. In addition to articles published in American Political Science Review, European Journal of International Relations, International Organization, Security Studies, Review of International Studies and International Security, and numerous book chapters, he has edited or authored five books. Reconstructing the Cold War: The Early Years, 1945-1958 (Oxford 2012), won the 2013 American Political Science Association Robert Jervis-Paul Schroeder Award for Best Book in International Relations and History and the 2013 Marshall D. Shulman Award, presented by the Association of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies for the best book published that year on the international politics of the former Soviet Union and Central Europe. Social Construction of International Politics: Identities and Foreign Policies, Moscow, 1955 and 1999 (Cornell University Press, 2002) won the 2003 Shulman Award. Hopf received his B.A. from Princeton University in 1983 and Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1989. He was a Fulbright Professor in the autumn of 2001 at the European University at St. Petersburg and a former vice-chairperson of the Board of Directors of the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. His research has been supported by the Mershon Center, the Ford Foundation, the American Council for Learned Societies, the Olin and Davis Centers at Harvard University, and the Singapore Social Science Research Council. Making Identity Count (Oxford 2016), co-edited with Bentley Allan is the first installment of the project, Making Identity Count, which entails the creation of a large-n interpretivist national identity database of all great powers from 1810-2010. This project has spurred the creation of the Making Identity Count in Asia project, the results of which are available at Making Identity Count in Asia

Research interests

  • multilingualism
  • language change
  • language and culture contact
  • conversion to Christianity
  • language socialization
  • language description and documentation

Current research

Bilingualism at home and in church:  a holistic study of language contact in social contexts

Language contact and multilingualism have been driving language change throughout the human history. A common outcome of multilingualism is transfer of linguistic features from one language to another in the speech of multilingual individuals. Yet how exactly transferred features become, or don’t become, a monolingual language norm remains poorly understood. A study of a multilingual West-African ecology proposed in my project, with Mano and Kpelle languages at its core, aims at filling this gap by looking at language contact through a dual lens: a close ethnographic study of the social context of contact and an analysis of its various linguistic consequences. I develop a methodologically innovative holistic program combining an investigation of individual and language-level processes, synchrony and diachrony, ethnography, corpus study and experiment.

Short bio

I am an interdisciplinary researcher studying at the intersection of anthropology, sociolinguistics, and structural linguistics. My research is underpinned by extensive fieldwork and focuses on cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparison; my current project explores language contact between the under-studied Mano and Kpelle languages in West Africa in their social context. I initially trained as a linguist, but quickly expanded my area of expertize into sociology and anthropology as well. I received my PhD at Inalco, Paris in 2015 and spent three following years as a postdoc in the Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley. I came to Helsinki in 2017 and until 2020 was a member of the Helsinki University Humanities Program.

Research interests

  • Discourse analysis
  • English in the world
  • Multilingualism
  • Sociolinguistics

Current research

A Bakhtinian analysis of struggles over language in multilingual university settings

My project at the Collegium concerns the ongoing tensions between regulated language use and multilingual realities in contemporary academia, which I explore through the lens of Bakhtin’s theory of language. Although language policies often promote multilingualism, the contact between English and the national language(s) generates frictions which push multilingual practices to the backstage. What makes this dynamics of multilingualism so contentious? My project aims to 1) bring together relevant theoretical concepts from Bakhtin’s patchy, sometimes unfinished, work in order to develop a coherent analytical framework; and 2) to apply and scrutinise this framework  through the analysis of specific domains of language use. By questioning the boundaries of languages whilst also recognising their continued endurance, the proposed framework engages with ongoing scholarly debates surrounding ontologies and roles of English outside anglophone contexts.

Short bio

I am Professor of English linguistics in the Department of English, Stockholm University, Sweden. After completing my PhD (University of Manchester, 1999), I have been researching academic uses of English. I am currently interested in exploring contemporary phenomena involving the use of English in non-anglophone contexts, e.g. English-medium instruction, writing for research and publication purposes, and the impact of digital media on literacy practices. Over the last few years, I have been a visiting researcher at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the University of Helsinki. Recent publications include 'Language Perceptions and Practices in Multilingual Universities' (2020, Palgrave Macmillan; with Kathrin Kaufhold and Niina Hynninen).

Research interests

  • Science and technology studies
  • Economic sociology
  • Feminist theory

Current research

Ecological Assetization: New Configurations of Economy and Ecology

This project aims to bridge the gap between environmental economics and the environmental humanities (broadly defined), by examining the phenomenon of ecological assetization. Ecological assetization is central to the current turn to the debt-based finance of the green economy but has until now received scant attention in environmental humanities. This project does not simply extract knowledge from environmental economics to supplement the theorisations of the environmental humanities, nor only criticize the former from the standpoints of the latter.  Rather, it aims to generate productive conversations and collaborations between environmental economics and environmental humanities. It investigates one of the most challenging issues facing humanity today: how to simultaneously cultivate ecological and economic sustainability.

Short bio

Liu Xin is a postdoctoral researcher at the Swedish School of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki. Liu has published in Australian Feminist Studies, Parallax, MAI: Feminism & Visual Culture, Girlhood Studies, NORA, Nordic Journal of Migration Research, Sukupuolentutkimus-Genusforskning, Feminist Encounters: A journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics. Her recent projects examine the phenomenon of air pollution in the Chinese context as well as the reproduction of norms in digital games.

Research interests

  • History of the United States
  • Campaigns, elections, and voting
  • Gender

Current research

The politics of the gender gap in voting: the case of the United States in comparative perspective, c. 1968–c. 2000

A ‘gender gap’ separates the voting behaviour of women from that of men in many countries today, including the United States. This project explores how, and with what consequences, political actors in that country – not only candidates and elected politicians but also leading figures in interest groups – engaged with the emergence of the modern ‘gender gap’ in voting over the last third of the twentieth century. This exploration makes use of a comparative framework. Research by social scientists identifies connections between gender and policy preferences, visible in most post-industrial countries, but their work fails to explain differences between countries and it does not investigate questions relating to political actors’ agency. Work by historians about the rise of conservatism in the United States, within a context of political polarisation, has tended to neglect the gendered dimensions of these developments. By tackling such questions, the project seeks to achieve a better understanding of how gender intersects with electoral politics during the contemporary era.

Short bio

A historian of the United States during the twentieth century, Robert Mason is the author of Richard Nixon and the Quest for a New Majority (2004) and The Republican Party and American Politics from Hoover to Reagan (2012). With Iwan Morgan, he is coeditor of Seeking a New Majority: The Republican Party and American Politics, 1960–1980 (2013) and The Liberal Consensus Reconsidered: American Politics and Society in the Postwar Era (2017). He has recently completed a biographical study of Spiro T. Agnew, and he is now conducting research on the history of the ‘gender gap’ in voting.

Research interests

  • Philosophy of time
  • Philosophy of religion

Current research

From Divine Timemaker to Divine Watchmaker

I am examining the following four questions. What is time? In what sense is God responsible for the existence of time? What kind of structure might God give to a time series? What are the implications for religious doctrines of creation, providence, and life after death?

Short bio

R.T. Mullins (PhD, University of St Andrews). Works on philosophical theology. Previous publications include "The End of the Timeless God," (Oxford University Press, 2016). "God and Emotion," (Cambridge University Press, 2020).

Research interests

  • Discourse analysis
  • Law and society
  • Human rights

Current research

Appropriated narratives of resistance

I study the ways in which political resistance, civil disobedience and conscientious objection are appropriated into the narratives of Western democracy, which, in turn, legitimate the use of power in the form of law. I am interested in the ways in which the attempts to fundamentally challenge the prevailing notion of ‘us’ (resistance) is narratively appropriated into ‘our story’ and thus deflated. I suggest that the theories of civil disobedience may result in appropriating the struggle of ‘the Other’ into ‘our’ narrative of ‘us’ as democratic, progressive, and liberal.

Short bio

My research focuses on the interplay between power, law and society. My research interests expand from legal policy research to socio-legal theory and I am particularly inspired by different forms of discourse analysis. After completing my PhD I have conducted legal policy and access to justice research at the institute of Criminology and Legal Policy (University of Helsinki) and participated in the project SILE – Silent agents affected by legislation (Strategic research council).

Research interests

  • Philosophy of action
  • Mental causation
  • Metaphysics of persons and personal identity
  • Theories of understanding

Current research

The Committed Mind

Recent social psychological research has led some psychologists and philosophers to conclude that the conscious mind is quite insignificant in shaping our behaviour. Beliefs, desires, or intentions that are consciously held by us are deemed largely irrelevant to generating even those behaviours of ours that we regard as intentional, deliberate. On this view, much or most of our behaviour results from unconscious processes.  And yet we seem to be able to consciously devise and execute intricate and well-thought-out plans. And our conscious thought seems to allow us to plan and engage in shared intentional behaviours together with others.  This research project – The Committed Mind – explores the hypothesis that scepticism about the role of the conscious mind does not take adequate account of the nature and causal role of commitment in the lives of neurotypical adult humans. The main aim is to develop a new philosophical theory of the nature of commitment. This theory will allow us to re-evaluate radical skepticism about the role of conscious thought in shaping our behaviour.

Short bio

Lilian O’Brien works in contemporary analytic philosophy of action. She received her PhD in philosophy from Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, and a B.A. and M.A. from University College Cork. She has taught at Vassar College, The College of William and Mary, University College Cork, and the University of Helsinki.

Research Interests

  • Sound studies
  • Decolonial thinking
  • Voice and politics

Current Research

On Temporalities of (Colonial) Sonic Biometrics

My proposed research focuses on inquiring the development and deployment of automated accent recognition technologies in the migration and border industry of Germany and its near-future extension within the European Union. More specifically, it explores the materiality of speech and accent databases, and their possible constitution as archives of the human voice. By working within methods found in sound studies and decolonial thinking, expressed through not only academic but also artistic means, this research proposes a closer investigation of the different temporalities of what I call the colonial politics of sonic biometrics. In other words, how the acts of collecting, ranking, taxonomizing, and normalizing sound-based human traits such as timbre, pitch, rhythm, intonation, and their subsequent automation by software, is weaponized in the border-industrial complex with the purpose of curbing the movement of racialized, gendered and sexed bodies.

Short bio

Pedro Oliveira is a researcher, sound artist, and educator. His research focuses on a material inquiry of sound, using both artistic and academic methods to explore and interrogate the articulations of listening, coloniality, and violence in the policing of urban and border spaces.

Research interests

My research ranges across image and text, addressing questions about the more-than-human dimensions of ethics and art, defined as an openness to the living world.  Key words: animals in literature and film; Simone Weil; more-than-human ethics

Current research

Simone Weil and Cinema: Looking, Eating, Letting Be

"Simone Weil and Cinema: Looking, Eating, Letting Be" brings together the religious philosophy of Simone Weil (1909-1943) and the area of film studies. The project’s aim is, first, to contribute to discussions of Weil’s aesthetics with an emphasis on the visual dimensions of her thought and, second, to reconsider cinema’s role in the age of the Anthropocene. Through a close engagement with Weil’s texts and conceptual framework, the project intertwines the disciplines of film, ecology, and theology to articulate a nonviolent ontology of cinema.

Short bio

Anat Pick teaches Film at Queen Mary University of London. Her book Creaturely Poetics: Animality and Vulnerability in Literature and Film (Columbia University Press, 2011) develops a “creaturely” approach to literature and film based on the shared vulnerability of human and nonhuman beings. The coedited collection Screening Nature: Cinema Beyond the Human (Berghahn, 2013) intersects film studies and the emergent fields of ecocriticism and critical animal studies. Anat has published widely in the areas of animals in film, vegan studies, and non-anthropocentric film philosophy.

 

Research interests

  • Communication context
  • Consumer society
  • Ethics
  • Foucauldian discourse analysis
  • Mediation
  • Poland
  • Racism

 Current research

Racism without others: Everyday mediations in Poland

In my postdoctoral project I cross-fertilise communication studies with disciplines such as sociology, history and social geography to understand racism in Poland where the racialised others are physically absent but continuously present in everyday communication. Decentring a recent racist turn in political and public discourses, I turn to the mundane communication avenues as sites where globally circulated racist discourses are articulated through the local socio-cultural and/or politico-historical repositories. In Foucauldian spirit, I examine how these discourses construct the racialised others as objects of knowledge and, in doing so, contribute to the augmentation of racist subjectivities in the Polish society. I theorise that in Poland racism is discursively instrumentalised to uphold the self-congratulatory national self-definition.   The project pursues this proposition in three case studies. The first study probes how orientalist discourses prefigure representations of the racialised people and destinations that circulate in the blogosphere. The second study looks at how the discourse of threat, spuriously associated with multiculturalism, plays out in the national legacy media. The third study scrutinises how the discourse of un/worthiness of the racialised others intersects with the marginalisation of ethnic minorities in the built urban environment.

Short bio

Kinga Polynczuk-Alenius is a media and communication researcher interested in the role of communication and its contexts in addressing, or not, ethical challenges that face an increasingly globalised world. To study this issue, she promiscuously branches out into various adjacent disciplines, such as sociology, social and cultural anthropology, social geography, and literary studies. She defended her doctoral dissertation, titled Ethical trade communication as moral education, at the University of Helsinki in 2018. Her articles have been published in academic journals such as 'Globalizations', 'International Journal of Cultural Studies', and 'Media and Communication'.

Research interests

  • Fertility behaviour
  • Intergenerational transmission
  • Early family environment (parent-child relationship, socioeconomic status, and psychosocial environment)
  • Psychosocial determinants of physical and mental health
  • Heterogeneity of depression

Current research

Psychosocial Factors Driving Fertility Decline in Finland and Other Nordic Countries

In my project, I focus on the role of fertility intentions in the recent fertility decline in the Nordic countries and explore them from psychological and demographic perspectives. In the last ten years, there has been a steep decline in the total fertility rates in the Nordic countries, with Finland exhibiting a particularly pronounced decline. The explanations for this decline are hotly debated but poorly understood. By using survey data from the Nordic countries, I investigate whether the actual fertility trends in the Nordic countries are anticipated by changes in fertility intentions. I also study how different psychosocial factors (such as values and attitudes; subjective well-being; early family environment; social networks) influence fertility intentions, and especially why people hesitate about having a first child. To understand why Finland exhibits the strongest fertility fall among the Nordic countries, I will compare psychosocial factors and fertility intentions in these countries.

Short bio

I am a research psychologist working in the fields of health psychology, family psychology, public health, mental health, and fertility. My PhD in Psychology (Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, 2017) was devoted to the transmission of  psychosocial factors such as parent-child relationship and socioeconomic position across generations and their relation to offspring health. As a postdoc, I investigated the role of psychosocial factors in pupils’ symptoms in Finnish schools with indoor air problems (2018-2019) and heterogeneity of depression (since 2020). Currently, I am interested in the role of psychosocial factors in fertility behaviour in Finland and Europe.

Research interests

  • Modern British social history
  • Gender history
  • History of emotions
  • History of crime

Current research

Unruly Emotions: Changing Emotional Cultures of Married Life in Britain, 1945-2000

This project maps how the state, medical profession and media influenced the marriage advice given to couples in Britain between 1945 and 2000 and how the emotional rules differed according to time period, class, gender and local socio-economic conditions. The research examines the impact of these attempts to regulate how emotions should be felt, shown, or supressed; the justifications for these interventions; and the extent to which expert knowledge about emotions shaped this advice, thus influencing how psychiatric knowledge was disseminated in society.  The research uses a mixture of archival and oral history methods to examine how the marriage advice given by various voluntary and state-run organisations and the problem pages of newspapers reflected and shaped the everyday emotional cultures of married life. Rather than just examining the most obvious emotions related to marriage, love and romance, the research also explores how different sources of marital advice instructed couples to express or repress more mundane emotions, such as boredom, sympathy and annoyance. Current research on the role of the state and civil society in regulating emotions primarily focuses on children. This project examines the ways in which such emotional training continued into adulthood and explores the wider implications of these intimate interventions for the relationship between the individual and society.

Short bio

Louise Settle completed a PhD at the University of Edinburgh in 2013 and has since held two postdoctoral fellowships, at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (Edinburgh, 2013-2014) and the Institute for Advanced Social Research (Tampere, 2016-2018). She has also undertaken research on the history of child sexual abuse as part of a collaborative project between Cambridge, Edinburgh and Sheffield universities.   Louise researches twentieth century British social history, with a particular focus on histories of crime, probation, prostitution, gender and emotions. Her publications include Sex For Sale In Scotland: Prostitution in Edinburgh and Glasgow, 1900-1939 (Edinburgh UP, 2016).

Research interests

  • Comparative study of Snow White fairy tales
  • Semiotics of colour terms
  • Estonia on the Medieval world maps
  • History of the language family tree theory
  • Taarapita - the great god of Estonia

Current research

What motives make a narrative a Snow White fairy tale (type ATU 709) and which colours does the tale contain?

My study on “Snow White” fairy tales is deeply rooted in the famous Finnish school of fairy tale research. My planned research is interdisciplinary, integrating linguistic, semiotic and folkloristic approaches. My first aim is to redefine the Snow White fairy tale type (ATU 709). For that purpose, I will use my own database with more than 150 Snow White tales before and after Brothers Grimm, originated from Asia, Africa, America, and Europe. The research question is: What motives or combination of motives make a narrative a Snow White fairy tale? My second aim is to take a closer look at the colours and colour vocabulary in Snow White narratives all around the world. I will rely on the basic colour term theory and semiotic theory of colours. The analysis proceeds from the structural method of fairy tale study. It explores the symbolic meaning oppositions of colours and their names, such as in/out, light/dark, life/death, logical/mythological. The research questions are: Which colours are used in different Snow White stories? What is their symbolic meaning?

Short bio

My first education is biology from the University of Tartu. I have studied bacterial nodules on the leafs of spearflower (Ardisia crispa). After that I studied linguistics at the University of Konstanz, Germany. My doctoral dissertation (University of Konstanz) was on the basic colour, taste and smell terms in Estonian. I was fifteen years the Director of the Institute of the Estonian Language in Tallinn and five years the Director of the Estonian Literary Museum in Tartu. At the same time, I was a Professor for anthropological and ethnolinguistics (currently Professor Emeritus) at the University of Tartu.

Research interests

  • Linguistic typology
  • Reported discourse
  • Quotative indexes
  • Language contacts

Current research

Perspective shift via sensitive referential devices in reported speech constructions of Finno-Ugric languages

Reported speech (RS) constructions often involve different kinds of ‘deictic shift’. Two formal categories are traditionally pointed out in connection with the deictic shift, representing an extreme opposite: ‘direct RS’ and ‘indirect RS’. In addition, an intermediate category labeled as ‘free indirect/semi-(in)direct/mixed RS’ is recognised. While the three traditional types of RS hold for languages like English, one can observe variation among referential devices in RS cross-linguistically. Recent studies on languages outside Europe have shown discrepancies between the marking of tense, modality, and evidentiality, personal, spatial & temporal references, honorifics & vocatives. This study aims to provide a more or less exhaustive list of sensitive referential elements in RS-constructions and check for the combination of the reporter’s and reported speaker’s perspective in RS among 6 Finno-Ugric languages (Finnish, Estonian, Erzya, Komi, Udmurt & Hungarian) representing 3 linguistic areas (Northeastern & Central Europe, and Russia). This investigation will show if the classic dichotomy of direct and indirect RS, questioned by some scholars working with more “exotic” languages, is still relevant for contemporary Finno-Ugric languages. Since so far, no language has been attested that would lack RS, increasing our knowledge about this phenomenon in more and less described languages will enrich our understanding of one of the principal mechanisms in human language.

Short bio

Denys Teptiuk is a research fellow at the University of Tartu, Estonia. In his research, he focuses on quotative indexes and reported speech & thought in Finno-Ugric languages (Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Komi, Udmurt & Erzya) and beyond (Russian and English). Denys also has a strong interest in the related domains of epistemic modality, evidentiality, engagement, and how these categories are realised among Eastern Finno-Ugric languages, especially in contact with dominant Russian. As a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Tartu, Denys also works in the project on discourse particles/markers in minor Uralic languages.

Research interests

  • Political economy of climate change
  • Environmental history of capitalism
  • Political economy of sustainability transformations
  • Far-right environmentalism

Current research

The Climate of the Far Right – Ideological and Materialist Articulations of Environmentalism in the Finnish and European Far Right

In my project, I study the role of the far right in the current climate and environmental crisis. I research the way the far right shapes its political and ideological agenda in a rapidly warming world where societies need to make unprecedented socio-ecological changes to mitigate global heating. To understand the current and future development of the “far-right environmentalism” in more depth, I will examine the Finnish far-right's understanding of nature, ecology, energy, and industrial organisation of nature in a longer historical perspective. I pay particular attention to the national and international crisis periods in which economic and ideological as well as environmental perceptions of political movements often face rapid reassessment. Furthermore, I analyse the differences and similarities between the environmental conceptions of the Finnish far right and the wider European far-right movement. My project contributes to the understanding of a topical and controversial tradition of environmental thinking as well as its future direction.

Short bio

My initial training is in economic, social and environmental history. I am interested in the study of past and present socio-ecological transformations and environmental history of capitalism. I seek to understand social and economic conflicts and contradictions related to the environment at both the world-system and local levels. In recent years, I have turned more deeply to multidisciplinary environmental studies and researched such topics as political economy of sustainability transformations, low-carbon industrial transition, political ecology of Finnish forestry and political resistance to climate mitigation. I am an original member of the interdisciplinary BIOS Research Unit (established in 2015) and editor-in-chief of the critical and multidisciplinary journal Tiede & edistys (Science & Progress).

 

Research interests

  • Second language use
  • English as a lingua franca
  • Chunking and multi-word units
  • Individual variation
  • Complex systems

Current research

Language at the individual level: a radical usage-based approach

The language of an individual has seldom, if ever, been the primary focus of research attention. Despite the advent of the usage-based paradigm, which sees language as emergent from usage, and variationist sociolinguistics, which pays heed to the diversity of human experience, we are still for the most part interested in the ‘average man’. Using corpus linguistic and behavioural speech processing data, this research project strives to find out to which extent different individuals infer different regularities from their language experience.

Short bio

Svetlana Vetchinnikova obtained her PhD in English Philology from the University of Helsinki in 2014. Since then, she worked in research projects on variation and change in English and on chunking in speech processing (PI: Prof. Anna Mauranen). More recently she was employed as a university lecturer in English Linguistics at the Department of Languages. She is author of Phraseology and the Advanced Language Learner (2019, Cambridge) and co-editor of Changing English (2017, De Gruyter) and Language Change: The Impact of English as a Lingua Franca (2020, Cambridge).

Research interests

  • Eighteenth-century studies
  • The British empire
  • Embodiment, materiality and experience
  • Gender and intersectionality
  • History of science
  • Cultural and intellectual history

Current research

Electrifying Bodies: Electric Medicine, Gender, and Knowledge in the British Atlantic World, c.1740-1800

The eighteenth century marks a period of electricity enthusiasm, when the newly discovered principles of this miraculous natural force were being harnessed to the wonder and improvement of humanity by a horde of doctors, natural philosophers, and charlatans. This project investigates these new therapeutic uses of medical electricity in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world from the perspective of patients’ bodily experiences and sensations. It argues that gendered and otherwise situated embodied experiences played a crucial but thus far overlooked role in the creation of eighteenth-century medical knowledge. The project employs an interdisciplinary methodology that combines historical methods with perspectives from feminist phenomenology and cognitive science. Using a variety of both patients’ accounts and scientific and popular publications as sources, the project shows that eighteenth-century scientific knowledge construction was hybridised and heterogenous, deeply embedded in tactile forms of knowing.

Short bio

Dr Soile Ylivuori, FRHistS, is an early-career historian of Britain and its eighteenth-century empire. A graduate of University of Helsinki (2016), she has held a Marie Curie Research Fellowship (QMUL), a Beinecke and Lewis Walpole Libraries Research Fellowship (Yale), and an Academy of Finland Postdoctoral Fellowship (Helsinki). Her previous projects have examined questions of embodiment, material identities, and circulation of knowledge and power in the eighteenth century. She is the author of Women and Politeness in Eighteenth-Century England: Bodies, Identities, and Power (Routledge, 2019) and has published several articles in, for example, Cultural and Social History and the Historical Journal.