Workshops

The workshops of the seminar for early career researchers and doctoral supervisors are presented here, along with a detailed timetable for the workshops. You find the presentations for each workshop (pdf-format) where the workshop is described (further down on this page).

Intended target audience

Doctoral students

Finishing doctoral students, Post-docs and Supervisors

Doctoral supervisors

Open for all interested participants

10.30-12.30

Writing workshop

Anna Sala Bubare & Mariona Corcelles

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

     

10.30-12.30

Research Ethics workshop

Anu Tammeleht

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

Preparing a post-PhD research grant proposal

Lynn McAlpine

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

Ethical challenges in supervision

Erika Löfström

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

Why Am I Doing a PhD?

Isabelle Skakni & Kelsey Inouye

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

                 L U N C H    

13.30-15.30

 

Writing workshop

Anna Sala Bubare & Mariona Corcelles

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

How to promote Early Career Researcher wellbeing

Solveig Cornér & Kirsi Pyhältö

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

Supervising Research Writing Workshop

Montserrat Castelló Badia

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

Scaffolding complex problem-solving

Anu Tammeleht & Erika Löfström

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

13.30-15.30  

Preparing a post-PhD research grant proposal

Lynn McAlpine

THIS WORKSHOP IS FULLY BOOKED!

   

Anu Tammeleht

PhD students and early-career researchers (ECRs) may face ethical dilemmas during their research. Often, it is not easy to pinpoint what the issue in the specific situation is and what to do about it. The ethics workshop is suitable for PhD students and ECRs who are familiar with the relevant codes of conduct within their field, but would like to practice recognising various ethical aspects and learn to analyse ethical dilemmas. During the 2 h workshop participants will work in groups of 3-4 dealing with cases, and learn to implement 2 tools for handling ethical dilemmas (in various fields). There are 3 tasks that gradually help participants recognise and deal with possible dilemmas that may emerge during the research process. During the workshop, participants develop their ethics competences by applying knowledge of research ethics. Participants will also practice collaborative ethical problem-solving.

Prerequisites: participants have familiarised themselves with their national code of conduct and the European Code of Conduct of Research Integrity ALLEA (2017).

The aim is to: 

  • Participants develop their ethics competences implementing previous knowledge of research ethics;
  • Participants can identify various stakeholders in ethical dilemmas and utilise the tool of ethical analysis.
  • Participants can see advantages of working collaboratively in groups.

Intended target audience: PhD students, early-career researchers.

Workshop presentation

Lynn McAlpine

Our goal in writing a research proposal is to convince readers that the proposed research is novel as well as achievable – in other words, worthy of being funded. You want to persuade readers of the potential of your proposed research AND your ability to carry it out. What can you do to help your prospects? In the workshop, you will have the opportunity to use ‘tools’ useful in assessing your own and others’ proposals. (Given time constraints, we can’t focus on any particular granting agency.). You will leave the workshop able to:

  • Situate a research proposal within the broader system in which it is located and have strategies for engaging with relevant stakeholders
  • Analyze any proposal as to the effectiveness of its structure
  • Compare and contrast the persuasiveness of different proposals

Intended target audience: The workshop is intended for PhD students in the final stages of their studies as well as recent PhD graduates.

Workshop presentation and Workshop handouts

 

Erika Löfström

Ethical aspects are always present in supervision, but they constitute often a less visible dimension of doctoral supervision. Ethical issues also tend to be challenging to tackle. Research shows that ethics is a central component of supervision that contributes to the doctoral student experience. While the basic ethical dilemmas are similar across disciplines, doctoral students and supervisors experience these differently suggesting that there are aspects in the supervisory relationship of which there is not sufficiently shared understanding. Doctoral students’ experiences are related to certain key outcomes of the doctoral process, such as engagement and satisfaction, well-being/burn-out, and consideration to discontinue doctoral studies. These implications will be discussed in the workshop. We draw on frameworks of ethical principles and ethical analysis. Activities include trying out tools for identifying, analyzing, and solving ethical dilemmas in supervision. The aim is to

  •  address, what is ethics in supervision,
  •  discuss, do the ethics matter, and if so, how, and
  •  identify how to handle ethical dilemmas in supervision.

The intended target audience is supervisors of doctoral research.

Workshop presentation

Isabelle Skakni & Kelsey Inouye

This research-based workshop is intended for doctoral students in their first or second year. The aim is to provide doctoral students with a rare opportunity to take stock of their doctoral journey and to share their experiences with peers who have similar interests and concerns. Through group discussions and brief written and visual exercises, participants will be encouraged to reflect upon their motivations for undertaking doctoral studies, their expectations for the journey, and the tricky experience of receiving and responding to feedback from their supervisors. We hope that they will then

  • become more aware of the influence that their goals and expectations have on their overall doctoral journey;
  • learn to make the most of supervisors’ feedback in developing their thesis to meet their goals and expectations; and
  • create a sense of community with other doctoral students, who are experiencing situations like them.

Intended target audience: PhD students in their first or second year.

Workshop presentation

Anna Sala Bubaré & Mariona Corcelles

The aim is to:

  • Promote and guide reflection about research writing experiences and conceptions.
  • Gain awareness about the process of writing, the problems we encounter and the solutions we attempt.
  • Learn strategies and resources to be a more effective research writer.

In this workshop, participants will be invited to reflect on their own writing journey and writing profile. Through a Journey Plot of the writing process of the last text they wrote and finished, they will be invited to share their problems and reflect on strategies to solve them. We will use the support material compiled on the website of the project ERASMUS + to share writing strategies and resources for academic writing. On the other hand, through the Writing Scale participants will be invited to find out their personal writing profile and to share it with other participants to reflect about the positive and negative aspects of the profile and how to be a more effective research writer. 

Intended target audience:  Doctoral students and Early Career Researchers.

Workshop presentation

Solveig Cornér & Kirsi Pyhältö

The doctoral journey and life after earning the PhD degree is both intellectually and emotionally challenging. High demands without proper support may compromise early career researchers’ (ECR) well-being. The workshop aims to promote participants research based understanding on factors contributing to ECR well-being, and provide tools to increasing it. The workshop provides participants an arena to reflect on and share your experiences and find out about tools and resources for overcoming stressors typically faced during the doctoral and post- doctoral experience. Resent research on ECR well-being will be summarized to enhance research based understanding on the anatomy of ERC well-being. Activating collaborative problem-based methods will be utilized in this workshop (Flinga). The workshop is intended for Early-Career Researchers, including PhD students and for recent PhD graduates (up to five years after degree completion).

The aim is to:

  • Enhance research based understanding on factors contributing to ECR well-being.
  • Provide tools and resources for overcoming stressors typically faced during the doctoral and post- doctoral experience.
  • Provide an arena for reflecting on and sharing your experiences

Intended target audience: PhD students, and Post PhD Researchers.

Workshop presentation

Montserrat Castelló Badia

Writing is a cognitive activity but is also social and situational and implies a highly specialized dialogical process in which students and supervisors engage throughout the doctoral journey across several genres. Moreover, learning to write across the doctorate is associated with helping students build their scholarly identities by the scientific discursive practices of disciplinary and professional communities.

Throughout the workshop we will engage in several guided activities to analyse how we, as supervisors, understand research writing and discuss the relationship between our understanding and the way in which we support students writing.

You will leave the workshop able to:

  • Identify the main challenges and needs related to writing supervision
  • Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of different types of supervisory research writing support profiles
  • Relate the supervisory writing profiles to what you usually do to support research writing

Intended target audience: The workshop is intended for supervisors with any level of expertise.

Workshop presentation

Anu Tammeleht & Erika Löfström

Supervisors may sometimes find themselves in situations where their supervisees or students face a complex problem, but would rather not tell them the right (or a possible) solution right away. Students benefit more from learning when they take an active part in finding the solution. The aim of the workshop is to provide supervisors with a tool that will help them enhance their teaching and supervision skills. In the scaffolding workshop supervisors will get to know and implement a scaffolding toolkit to help in developing supervision pedagogy and finding ways to tailor support individually. Supervisors will get familiar with a tool to support complex problem-solving and practice implementing it in collaborative group-work.

Learning outcomes: 

  • Participants get familiar with a scaffolding toolkit.
  • Participants practice implementing the scaffolding framework in their own cases.
  • Participants can see advantages of working collaboratively in groups.

Intended target audience: Supervisors to doctoral students.

Workshop presentation