Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information availble in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

Parallel panels. More information available in August 2021.

The Aleksanteri Conference has a long tradition of bringing in interesting artist and cultural actors to enrich the conference experience. This year we are happy to offer you a unique online lamentation workshop and a virtual tour of Helsinki from the view point of migrant history. Please, also remember the conference podcast, Eurasia and Global Migration, published since March 2021!

The past year and a half has been a difficult time for all of us. The feelings of loneliness, alienation, displacement, fear and worry have at times been overwhelming. Those already in a vulnerable position - such as migrants and minorities - have carried the biggest burden, but no-one has been completely immune to the uncertainty and apathy of COVID times.

Luckily, mankind has come up with diverse remedies to soothe the pain and anxiety caused by exceptional times in history. One such remedy, endemic in many cultures around the world, is lamentation: expressing one's sorrows in a culturally structured way, in music or poetry.

The Karelian lament -  or 'itkuvirsi' in Finnish -  is an extraordinary expressive form found in eastern Finland and Soviet Karelia that uses music, language, gesture, and the icons of crying to communicate affect and power. *

Let’s lament together!

The conference organisers would like to share this piece of Finnish culture with you! We have teamed up with two renowned Finnish folk musicians, Emmi Kuittinen and Charlotta Hagfors, who are going to refine our sorrows and fears into a traditional Karelian lament.

We are asking you to send us content for a shared, communal cry. What has made you sad this year? What are the anxieties troubling you? Cry it all out on the registration form! There is a free text field on the form, where you can type single words or full sentences ('isolation', 'worry for my old parents', 'What will happen to my fieldwork plans?'). Emmi and Charlotta will work your input into a common conference lament 2021, a piece of communal art where individuals cannot be identified.

The lament will be performed at the conference, and you will have a chance to learn it during the three days!

 

* Elizabeth Tolbert: Women Cry with Words: Symbolization of Affect in the Karelian Lament, in Yearbook for Traditional Music , Volume 22 , 1990 , pp. 80 - 105  (published online in 2019)

 

 

 

Have you ever thought how much the development of any city is dependent on migration?

Helsinki is a great example of this.

The Capitol itself had migrated from Southwestern Finland in the early 19th century due to the change in the geopolitical constellation of Finland. Geography played an important role ever since: Helsinki being a port city and having a railroad to Russia created an advantageous position being able to bridge East and West. This status on the other hand bore consequences on the mobility of people.

Whether the push and pull factors behind people’s movement was due to international crisis moments such as wars, revolutions, economic depressions or just because of the everyday search for better livelihood, jobs or just for family reasons, migration modified Helsinki enormously. It became an innovative, vibrant, and fast developing city.

If you want to know more of the past of migration in the Finnish capitol’s life why don’t you pop on to this tour?  Katalin Miklóssy will be your tour guide to the history of Helsinki.  

The Aleksanteri Conference podcast, Eurasia and Global Migration, introduces the themes of the conference. In the  monthly episodes, Dr. Katalin Miklóssy discusses Eurasian migration with scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds. The podcast can be followed via Soundcloud, iTunes or Spotify.